. Make a Donation

Index Page
Contact
About The Author
Sermons
Bible Quiz
Holy Day Calendar
Free Online Bibles
Bible Reading Plan

Question? Quick Search the thousands of Bible studies on this website.
Just type in topic word(s) or a question.

Saturday, August 3 2013

Genesis 14: The Rescue Of Lot

Abram (see the entire study series for Abram/Abraham, beginning with A Biography Of Abraham: The Genealogy Of Abram) and his nephew Lot had parted company because of their great herds of livestock (see Genesis 13: The Parting of Abram and Lot). Lot unwisely chose the beautiful (in appearance, ugly and vile in behavior) area around Sodom, while Abram settled in the hill country to the west, around Hebron (see A Biography Of Abraham: Mamre in Hebron).

Abraham and Lot

"13:10 And Lot lifted up his eyes, and beheld all the plain of Jordan, that it was well watered every where, before the LORD destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah, even as the garden of the LORD, like the land of Egypt, as thou comest unto Zoar. 13:11 Then Lot chose him all the plain of Jordan; and Lot journeyed east: and they separated themselves the one from the other.

13:12 Abram dwelled in the land of Canaan, and Lot dwelled in the cities of the plain, and pitched his tent toward Sodom. 13:13 But the men of Sodom were wicked and sinners before the LORD exceedingly.

13:14 And the LORD said unto Abram, after that Lot was separated from him, Lift up now thine eyes, and look from the place where thou art northward, and southward, and eastward, and westward: 13:15 For all the land which thou seest, to thee will I give it, and to thy seed for ever. 13:16 And I will make thy seed as the dust of the earth: so that if a man can number the dust of the earth, then shall thy seed also be numbered. 13:17 Arise, walk through the land in the length of it and in the breadth of it; for I will give it unto thee.

13:18 Then Abram removed his tent, and came and dwelt in the plain of Mamre, which is in Hebron, and built there an altar unto the LORD." (Genesis 13:10-18 KJV)

Abram, who the LORD (i.e. Jesus Christ; see Genesis 1: In The Beginning Was The Word and The Kingdom Of The LORD God) later renamed as Abraham, was a righteous man of peace - "peace," in that he was not malignant toward other people (see The Rise Of The Malignant Beast). Righteousness does however include, not only standing for what is right, but defending it, if necessary, by whatever means necessary. That righteous definition of whole peace was stated by the Messiah:

"11:21 When a strong man armed keepeth his palace, his goods are in peace" (Luke 11:21 KJV)

"3:27 No man can enter into a strong man's house, and spoil his goods, except he will first bind the strong man; and then he will spoil his house." (Mark 3:21 KJV)

Abram lived his life as a foreigner in the land of Canaan (see Camped Out In Canaan), subject to the conflicts of the nations in the area.

"14:1 And it came to pass in the days of Amraphel king of Shinar, Arioch king of Ellasar, Chedorlaomer king of Elam, and Tidal king of nations; 14:2 That these made war with Bera king of Sodom, and with Birsha king of Gomorrah, Shinab king of Admah, and Shemeber king of Zeboiim, and the king of Bela, which is Zoar. 14:3 All these were joined together in the vale of Siddim, which is the salt sea. 14:4 Twelve years they served Chedorlaomer, and in the thirteenth year they rebelled." (Genesis 14:1-4 KJV)

One such conflict began with an alliance of kings invading Canaan (see also What Does The Bible Really Say About Canaanites?).

"14:5 And in the fourteenth year came Chedorlaomer, and the kings that were with him, and smote the Rephaims in Ashteroth Karnaim, and the Zuzims in Ham, and the Emims in Shaveh Kiriathaim, 14:6 And the Horites in their mount Seir, unto Elparan, which is by the wilderness. 14:7 And they returned, and came to Enmishpat, which is Kadesh, and smote all the country of the Amalekites, and also the Amorites, that dwelt in Hazezontamar." (Genesis 14:5-7 KJV)

The kings of the nations of Canaan ("king" originally meant the patriarch of a kin - a family or tribe) attempted to defend their territory but were overcome. Among them were the kings of Sodom and Gomorrah, who were defeated and had their cities looted. The invaders "took all the goods of Sodom and Gomorrah, and all their victuals, and went their way." Among the booty was wealthy Lot and his property: "they took Lot, Abram's brother's son, who dwelt in Sodom, and his goods, and departed."

Abraham At War

"14:8 And there went out the king of Sodom, and the king of Gomorrah, and the king of Admah, and the king of Zeboiim, and the king of Bela (the same is Zoar;) and they joined battle with them in the vale of Siddim; 14:9 With Chedorlaomer the king of Elam, and with Tidal king of nations, and Amraphel king of Shinar, and Arioch king of Ellasar; four kings with five.

14:10 And the vale of Siddim was full of slimepits; and the kings of Sodom and Gomorrah fled, and fell there; and they that remained fled to the mountain. 14:11 And they took all the goods of Sodom and Gomorrah, and all their victuals, and went their way. 14:12 And they took Lot, Abram's brother's son, who dwelt in Sodom, and his goods, and departed." (Genesis 14:8-12 KJV)

One of those who escaped, who was likely one of Lot's servants (why would he go to Abram if he was merely a citizen of Sodom?) told Abram of Lot's capture.

"14:13 And there came one that had escaped, and told Abram the Hebrew; for he dwelt in the plain of Mamre the Amorite, brother of Eshcol, and brother of Aner: and these were confederate with Abram." (Genesis 14:13 KJV)

Abram then responded in a righteous manner: "he armed his trained servants, born in his own house, three hundred and eighteen, and pursued them unto Dan." Abram seems to have had a good understanding of military tactics; rather than a haphazard attempt to rescue Lot, Abram attacked, with the element of surprise, at night, from multiple directions.

"14:14 And when Abram heard that his brother was taken captive, he armed his trained servants, born in his own house, three hundred and eighteen, and pursued them unto Dan.

14:15 And he divided himself against them, he and his servants, by night, and smote them, and pursued them unto Hobah, which is on the left hand of Damascus.

14:16 And he brought back all the goods, and also brought again his brother Lot, and his goods, and the women also, and the people." (Genesis 14:14-16 KJV)

Upon his return, Abram was met by two men - one extremely righteous, Melchizedek (see the Fact Finder question below) and one extremely vile, the weak and degenerate king of Sodom.

"14:17 And the king of Sodom went out to meet him after his return from the slaughter of Chedorlaomer, and of the kings that were with him, at the valley of Shaveh, which is the king's dale.

14:18 And Melchizedek king of Salem brought forth bread and wine: and he was the priest of the most high God. 14:19 And he blessed him, and said, Blessed be Abram of the most high God, possessor of heaven and earth: 14:20 And blessed be the most high God, which hath delivered thine enemies into thy hand. And he gave him tithes of all." (Genesis 14:17-20 KJV)

The king of Sodom then attempted to make Abram a paid ally, but Abram refused any association with him.

"14:21 And the king of Sodom said unto Abram, Give me the persons, and take the goods to thyself.

14:22 And Abram said to the king of Sodom, I have lift up mine hand unto the LORD, the most high God, the possessor of heaven and earth, 14:23 That I will not take from a thread even to a shoelatchet, and that I will not take any thing that is thine, lest thou shouldest say, I have made Abram rich: 14:24 Save only that which the young men have eaten, and the portion of the men which went with me, Aner, Eshcol, and Mamre; let them take their portion." (Genesis 14:21-24 KJV)

Fact Finder: Who was Melchizedek?
See A History Of Jerusalem: Melchizedek's Salem


Book

Book

Book

Bible Quiz Daily Bible Study Library
Thousands of Studies!

Jesus Christ
Bible History
Prophecy
Christian Living
Encouragement
Eternal Life
By The Book
Bible Places
Curiosities
The Spirit World
Book

Book

Book


This Day In History, August 3

8: Roman General Tiberius defeated the Dalmatians at Bathinus. Tiberius later became Emperor, reigning at the time of Christ's Crucifixion (see A History Of Jerusalem: Pompey And The Caesars and Whatever Happened To Those Romans?).

435: Nestorius, the deposed Patriarch of Constantinople (the city was named after Constantine, the Roman Emperor who was the creator of many of the present-day doctrines of the Church of Rome and Rome's "Protestant" daughters who rejected the Pope's leadership but not his antichrist doctrines, including replacing the true Sabbath with the ancient Babylonian/Roman "sun day"; see Constantine's Crusades In History And Prophecy, A History Of Jerusalem: Constantine and Muhammad and Why Observe The True Sabbath?) was exiled by Roman Emperor Theodosius II to a monastery in Egypt. Nestorius is was the originator of "Nestorianism."

881: The Battle of Saucourt-en-Vimeu. King Louis III of France defeated Viking invaders (commemorated in the poem Ludwigslied).

1347: Six burghers of the surrounded French city of Calais surrendered to Edward III of England in hopes of ending the siege.

1492: Christopher Columbus sailed from Palos, Spain, on his first voyage to the "New World" - for him, the islands of the Caribbean Sea (see also Thanksgiving In History and Prophecy).

Voyages of Christopher Columbus 1527: The first documented postal letter sent from North America was "mailed" from what is today St. John's, Newfoundland.

1546: French printer Etienne Dolet, accused of heresy, blasphemy and sedition, was hanged and burned at the stake for printing reformist literature.

1553: Mary Tudor, the new Queen of England, entered London.

1610: English explorer Henry Hudson discovered a great bay on the north coast of Canada. It was later named after Hudson himself - Hudson's Bay.

1678: French explorer Robert de La LaSalle (Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle) built Le Griffon, the first known ship built on the Great Lakes.

1783: An eruption of Mount Asama in Japan killed over 35,000 people.

1797: Jeffrey Amherst died at age 80. Amherst was the army commander who captured what is today Canada for Britain (1758-1760). Leading a force of 14,000 he captured the French fortress of Louisbourg, Nova Scotia, in 1758, and when Montreal surrendered to him in 1760 all of Canada fell to the British.

1805: Mohammed Ali became the new ruler of Egypt (see A Biography Of Abraham: Abrahamic Religions and A History Of Jerusalem: Constantine and Muhammad).

1914: During the First World War, airplanes were used for the first time in a military capacity when Italian planes reconnoitered Turkish lines near Tripoli.

1914: Germany declared war on France, and entered Belgium. Later that night, Britain declared war on Germany after warning the Germans not to enter Belgium Listen also to our Sermon The European World Wars).

1934: Adolf Hitler (who was elected; see also Presidential Quotes On War, Terrorism, Religion) merged the offices of President and Chancellor into Der Fuehrer ("the Leader").

1948: Whittaker Chambers accused Alger Hiss of being a communist and a spy for the Soviet Union. It began the xenophobic "Red Scare" hysteria in the U.S. (also known as "McCarthyism"), a modern-day witch-hunt that destroyed the careers and reputations of many innocent people for over a decade.

1960: Niger became independent from colonial France.

1972: The U.S. Senate ratified the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty (which had no genuine effect on the spread of nuclear weapons of mass destruction).

1981: Senegalese opposition parties, under the leadership of Mamadou Dia, launched the "Antiimperialist Action Front-Suxxali Reew Mi".

2001: "Irish Republican Army" terrorists detonated a car bomb in London.

2005: A military coup in Mauritania overthrew the government of President Maaouya Ould Sid'Ahmed Taya while he was in Saudi Arabia for the funeral of King Fahd.

2005: Mahmoud Ahmadinejad became President of Iran.


.


.

.


.


editionDBSx201702et

Copyright © Wayne Blank