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Monday, January 13 2014

Deuteronomy 20: Articles Of War

A quote from an article entitled "Articles of War" in Wikipedia on January 9 2014:

"The Articles of War are a set of regulations drawn up to govern the conduct of a country's military and naval forces. The phrase was first used in 1637 in Robert Monro's His Expedition with the worthy Scots regiment called Mac-keyes regiment etc. (in the form "Articles of warres") and can be used to refer to military law in general. However, the term is usually used more specifically and with the modern spelling and capitalisation to refer to the British regulations drawn up in the wake of the Glorious Revolution and the U.S. regulations later based on them."

Jericho The LORD (Who was and is Jesus Christ - see Genesis 1: In The Beginning Was The Word and The Kingdom Of The LORD God) also gave the ancient Israelites a formal set of Articles of War to govern their military conduct. Their foremost mandate guaranteed their victory, if they followed Him: For the LORD your God is he that goeth with you, to fight for you against your enemies, to save you."

"20:1 When thou goest out to battle against thine enemies, and seest horses, and chariots, and a people more than thou, be not afraid of them: for the LORD thy God is with thee, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt. 20:2 And it shall be, when ye are come nigh unto the battle, that the priest shall approach and speak unto the people, 20:3 And shall say unto them, Hear, O Israel, ye approach this day unto battle against your enemies: let not your hearts faint, fear not, and do not tremble, neither be ye terrified because of them; 20:4 For the LORD your God is he that goeth with you, to fight for you against your enemies, to save you." (Deuteronomy 20:1-4 KJV)

As in modern times, some, for the sake of the greater moral and/or economic well-being of the nation, were excused from military service during the time of their exceptional circumstance.

"20:5 And the officers shall speak unto the people, saying, What man is there that hath built a new house, and hath not dedicated it? let him go and return to his house, lest he die in the battle, and another man dedicate it. 20:6 And what man is he that hath planted a vineyard, and hath not yet eaten of it? let him also go and return unto his house, lest he die in the battle, and another man eat of it. 20:7 And what man is there that hath betrothed a wife, and hath not taken her? let him go and return unto his house, lest he die in the battle, and another man take her. 20:8 And the officers shall speak further unto the people, and they shall say, What man is there that is fearful and fainthearted? let him go and return unto his house, lest his brethren's heart faint as well as his heart. 20:9 And it shall be, when the officers have made an end of speaking unto the people, that they shall make captains of the armies to lead the people." (Deuteronomy 20:5-9 KJV)

The Israelites were to first offer the opposing force terms of surrender: "And it shall be, if it make thee answer of peace, and open unto thee, then it shall be, that all the people that is found therein shall be tributaries unto thee, and they shall serve thee." If the offer of peace was refused, the Israelites were to annihilate them. The Israelites fought only those who wanted to fight.

"20:10 When thou comest nigh unto a city to fight against it, then proclaim peace unto it. 20:11 And it shall be, if it make thee answer of peace, and open unto thee, then it shall be, that all the people that is found therein shall be tributaries unto thee, and they shall serve thee. 20:12 And if it will make no peace with thee, but will make war against thee, then thou shalt besiege it: 20:13 And when the LORD thy God hath delivered it into thine hands, thou shalt smite every male thereof with the edge of the sword: 20:14 But the women, and the little ones, and the cattle, and all that is in the city, even all the spoil thereof, shalt thou take unto thyself; and thou shalt eat the spoil of thine enemies, which the LORD thy God hath given thee. 20:15 Thus shalt thou do unto all the cities which are very far off from thee, which are not of the cities of these nations." (Deuteronomy 20:10-15 KJV)

Unlike present-day conflicts that almost always devastate the infrastructure of the enemy nation, the Israelites were to conserve, as much as possible, the environment.

"20:16 But of the cities of these people, which the LORD thy God doth give thee for an inheritance, thou shalt save alive nothing that breatheth: 20:17 But thou shalt utterly destroy them; namely, the Hittites, and the Amorites, the Canaanites, and the Perizzites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites; as the LORD thy God hath commanded thee: 20:18 That they teach you not to do after all their abominations, which they have done unto their gods; so should ye sin against the LORD your God.

20:19 When thou shalt besiege a city a long time, in making war against it to take it, thou shalt not destroy the trees thereof by forcing an axe against them: for thou mayest eat of them, and thou shalt not cut them down (for the tree of the field is man's life) to employ them in the siege: 20:20 Only the trees which thou knowest that they be not trees for meat, thou shalt destroy and cut them down; and thou shalt build bulwarks against the city that maketh war with thee, until it be subdued." (Deuteronomy 20:16-20 KJV)

Fact Finder: How many wars have the present-day Israelites fought?
See Israel's Wars In The Twentieth Century


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This Day In History, January 13

532: The Nika riots began in Constantinople. Over the next week, it became the most destructive riot in the history of Constantinople; half the city was severely damaged or burned and tens of thousands of people were killed. The riots began from confrontations between opposing sports fans of the chariot races.

888: Odo, Count of Paris became King of the Franks.

1559: Elizabeth I was crowned Queen of England in Westminster Abbey. The daughter of King Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, the reign of Elizabeth I began with the defeat of the Spanish Armada. During her time, Britain rose to international power and prominence, beginning colonization that produced its worldwide empire of commerce and civilization over the next 400 years. A golden age for Britain, Elizabeth's contemporaries were the likes of Francis Bacon, William Shakespeare, Walter Raleigh, Francis Drake, John Hawkins, Martin Frobisher and many others whose names are familiar still today.

Queen Elizabeth 1610: Galileo Galilei discovered Calisto, the 4th moon of Jupiter (see also Parabolic Prophecies).

1691: George Fox, English founder of the Society of Friends, or Quakers, died at age 66. He left the Church of England (the "Anglican" Church) at age 23 and founded the Quaker movement in 1660 at age 36.

1733: James Oglethorpe, a Member of the British Parliament, and 130 others, arrived in North America to found a new colony. In honor of King George II, he named it Georgia.

1785: John Walter published the first issue of The London Times.

1842: During the Afghan Wars (in which history is being repeated again today), about 16,000 British and Indian troops were massacred in the Khyber Pass during an attempted retreat from Kabul.

1849: Vancouver Island was granted to the Hudson's Bay Company.

1849: British forces under Lord Gough defeated the Sikhs at the Battle of Chillianwallah, India.

1898: French author Emile Zola published his "J'Accuse" letter, accusing the French government of a cover-up in the Alfred Dreyfus treason case.

1900: To combat Czech nationalism, Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria-Hungary decreed that German would be the language of the imperial army.

1915: A massive earthquake killed over 30,000 people in Italy.

1915: South African troops under Louis Botha occupied Swakopmund in German South West Africa.

1923: Adolf Hitler denounced the Weimar Republic as 5,000 of his "storm troopers" strutted in the streets. Hitler subscribed to the self-destructive fantasy that "the more strong I am, the more right I am" (see Presidential Quotes On War, Terrorism, Religion).

1935: In a plebiscite, the Saar region voted for incorporation into Germany.

1942: Henry Ford patented a plastic automobile. It was 30% lighter than a regular car (used less fuel) and didn't corrode like steel cars. The steel industry convinced Ford to abandon the idea and continue producing gas-guzzling, corroding cars.

1942: During the Second World War (listen to our Sermon The European World Wars), Nazi U-boats began attacking ships off the coast of North America.

1942: During the Second World War, the first use of an aircraft ejection seat was done, by a German test pilot in a Heinkel He 280 jet fighter.

1945: At the end of the Second World War, Raoul Wallenberg was taken into custody by Soviet forces when they took Budapest. The 34 year old Swedish diplomat saved about 100,000 Hungarian Jews from the Nazi Holocaust before his arrest. He was never heard from again, despite diplomatic efforts by numerous nations for over 40 years after his arrest.

1976: Britain applied for credit of almost 1 billion Pounds from the International Monetary Fund.

1982: In Washington, D.C., Air Florida Flight 90 crashed into the Potomac River 73 seconds after takeoff. Of the 5 crew members and 74 passengers, only 6 people, 3 men and 3 women, survived the crash. The survivors waited in the frigid water for 22 minutes before a Park Service helicopter arrived to remove them from the river. A 46 year old bank executive was the first survivor to have a lifeline dropped to him from the helicopter, but he passed it to another survivor, as he repeatedly did for all of the other 5 people. When the helicopter returned the sixth time to finally rescue him, he was gone.

1993: Former East German leader Erich Honecker, under whom the Berlin Wall was built, left a Berlin prison for exile in Chile; a court freed him because he was dying.



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