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Tuesday, January 14 2014

Deuteronomy 21: Applications Of The Law

Along with the Law of the LORD (Who was and is Jesus Christ - see Genesis 1: In The Beginning Was The Word and The Kingdom Of The LORD God) itself, the Holy Scriptures provide many examples of how the Law was to be applied in ancient Israel.

Just as in modern times, law enforcement was assigned to officials in local jurisdictions. This example involves the determination of which "county" a murder was committed in (see also Deuteronomy 19: Innocent Unless Proven Guilty).

Israel

"21:1 If one be found slain in the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee to possess it, lying in the field, and it be not known who hath slain him: 21:2 Then thy elders and thy judges shall come forth, and they shall measure unto the cities which are round about him that is slain: 21:3 And it shall be, that the city which is next unto the slain man, even the elders of that city shall take an heifer, which hath not been wrought with, and which hath not drawn in the yoke; 21:4 And the elders of that city shall bring down the heifer unto a rough valley, which is neither eared nor sown, and shall strike off the heifer's neck there in the valley: 21:5 And the priests the sons of Levi shall come near; for them the LORD thy God hath chosen to minister unto him, and to bless in the name of the LORD; and by their word shall every controversy and every stroke be tried: 21:6 And all the elders of that city, that are next unto the slain man, shall wash their hands over the heifer that is beheaded in the valley: 21:7 And they shall answer and say, Our hands have not shed this blood, neither have our eyes seen it. 21:8 Be merciful, O LORD, unto thy people Israel, whom thou hast redeemed, and lay not innocent blood unto thy people of Israel's charge. And the blood shall be forgiven them. 21:9 So shalt thou put away the guilt of innocent blood from among you, when thou shalt do that which is right in the sight of the LORD." (Deuteronomy 21:1-9 KJV)

Foreign captives of war could become Israelites, according to the custom of the time (see Deuteronomy 20: Articles Of War).

"21:10 When thou goest forth to war against thine enemies, and the LORD thy God hath delivered them into thine hands, and thou hast taken them captive, 21:11 And seest among the captives a beautiful woman, and hast a desire unto her, that thou wouldest have her to thy wife; 21:12 Then thou shalt bring her home to thine house; and she shall shave her head, and pare her nails; 21:13 And she shall put the raiment of her captivity from off her, and shall remain in thine house, and bewail her father and her mother a full month: and after that thou shalt go in unto her, and be her husband, and she shall be thy wife. 21:14 And it shall be, if thou have no delight in her, then thou shalt let her go whither she will; but thou shalt not sell her at all for money, thou shalt not make merchandise of her, because thou hast humbled her." (Deuteronomy 21:10-14 KJV)

The rights of the firstborn were based upon the responsibilities of the firstborn. The custom was established for a purpose (see also The Firstborn Of Passover).

"21:15 If a man have two wives, one beloved, and another hated, and they have born him children, both the beloved and the hated; and if the firstborn son be hers that was hated: 21:16 Then it shall be, when he maketh his sons to inherit that which he hath, that he may not make the son of the beloved firstborn before the son of the hated, which is indeed the firstborn: 21:17 But he shall acknowledge the son of the hated for the firstborn, by giving him a double portion of all that he hath: for he is the beginning of his strength; the right of the firstborn is his." (Deuteronomy 21:15-17 KJV)

Rebels were regarded as the misfits that they almost always are (see also Numbers 11: Winners and Whiners).

"21:18 If a man have a stubborn and rebellious son, which will not obey the voice of his father, or the voice of his mother, and that, when they have chastened him, will not hearken unto them: 21:19 Then shall his father and his mother lay hold on him, and bring him out unto the elders of his city, and unto the gate of his place; 21:20 And they shall say unto the elders of his city, This our son is stubborn and rebellious, he will not obey our voice; he is a glutton, and a drunkard. 21:21 And all the men of his city shall stone him with stones, that he die: so shalt thou put evil away from among you; and all Israel shall hear, and fear." (Deuteronomy 21:18-21 KJV)

Executed people were to be promptly buried - a law and principle that still existed at the time of the Sacrifice of the Messiah (see Joseph and Nicodemus: Making A Stand).

"21:22 And if a man have committed a sin worthy of death, and he be to be put to death, and thou hang him on a tree: 21:23 His body shall not remain all night upon the tree, but thou shalt in any wise bury him that day; (for he that is hanged is accursed of God;) that thy land be not defiled, which the LORD thy God giveth thee for an inheritance." (Deuteronomy 21:22-23 KJV)

Fact Finder: What's the difference between liberty and liberal?
See Righteous Liberty


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This Day In History, January 14

1236: Henry III married Eleanor of Provence.

1301: Andrew III of Hungary died, thereby ending the Arpad dynasty.

1526: Francis I surrendered claims to Burgundy, Italy, and Flanders.

1529: Spanish reformer Juan de Valdes, 29, published his Dialogue on Christian Doctrine which paved the way in Spain for Protestant ideas. His treatise was condemned by the Spanish Inquisition, and Valdes was forced to flee Spain, never to return.

The New World 1539: Spain annexed Cuba.

1601: Roman Catholic authorities in Rome burned Hebrew books (see also Translation Of Translations).

1604: The Hampton Court Conference began under King James I (the King James Bible is named after him) to address Puritan demands for doctrinal changes in the Church of England.

1699: Massachusetts held a day of fasting for wrongly persecuting "witches" (see also Deuteronomy 19: Innocent Unless Proven Guilty).

1742: English astronomer Edmond Halley died at age 86. He was the first to accurately predict the return of a comet. It is now named after him - Halley's Comet.

1797: In the Battle of Rivoli in Italy, the French under Napoleon defeated an Austrian attempt to relieve Mantua. 3,500 Austrian troops were killed.

1814: The Treaty of Kiel transferred Norway from the king of Denmark to the king of Sweden.

1837: Francois, the Marquis de Barbe-Marbois, died at age 92. The French statesman negotiated the Louisiana Purchase with the U.S. in 1803.

1858: Italian revolutionary Felice Orsini threw bombs at Napoleon III in Paris in an assassination attempt; several people were killed but Emperor Napoleon and Empress Eugenie were unharmed.

1878: The first private connection by telephone in Great Britain was made on the Isle of Wight when Queen Victoria spoke to Thomas Biddulph.

1893: Pope Leo XIII appointed Archbishop Francesco Satolli as the Vatican's first ambassador to the U.S.

1911: Roald Amundsen's South Pole expedition arrived on the eastern edge of the Ross Ice Shelf.

1898: Charles Dodgson died at age 65. Although the British scholar was a lecturer in mathematics at Oxford University, and was a pioneer photographer, he is remembered, under the pen name Lewis Carroll, as the author of Alice in Wonderland.

1943: British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt and French President Charles De Gaulle met in Casablanca to agree on a strategy for concluding the Second World War and to demand the unconditional surrender from the Germany.

1950: The first flight of the Russian MiG-17 fighter aircraft.

1953: Marshal Tito was elected the first president of the Republic of Yugoslavia.

1969: The Soviet spacecraft Soyuz 4 was launched, followed the next day by Soyuz 5. They achieved the first docking of 2 manned spacecraft in Earth orbit.

1991: Three Palestinian terrorist chiefs, including Abu Iyad, were assassinated in Tunis.


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