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Thursday, April 10 2014

1 Samuel 24: The Cave Of The Wild Goats Incident

"And he said to David, Thou art more righteous than I: for thou hast rewarded me good, whereas I have rewarded thee evil"

The Israelite civil war (see Israel In History and Prophecy: The Civil War) had two major ironies. The most obvious was that while the Israelites were fighting each other, they were also at war with the hostile nations around them - primarily the militarily-powerful Philistines (see 1 Samuel 23: David's Escape From Keilah). The other major irony was that Saul pursued David to kill David, while David only fled from Saul to keep from killing Saul (see 1 Samuel 21: Why Didn't David Kill Saul?). It was a "twilight zone" war.

One day, while Saul was pursuing David among "the rocks of the wild goats" at Engedi, Saul blundered into a cave to attend to a biological function - without realizing that David and his troops were in the lightless cave (another example of either the incompetence of Saul's troops - or their deliberate attempts to get their by-then obviously incompetent leader killed). "Then David arose, and cut off the skirt of Saul's robe privily." David could just as easily have slit Saul's throat.

Engedi

"24:1 And it came to pass, when Saul was returned from following the Philistines, that it was told him, saying, Behold, David is in the wilderness of Engedi. 24:2 Then Saul took three thousand chosen men out of all Israel, and went to seek David and his men upon the rocks of the wild goats.

24:3 And he came to the sheepcotes by the way, where was a cave; and Saul went in to cover his feet: and David and his men remained in the sides of the cave. 24:4 And the men of David said unto him, Behold the day of which the LORD said unto thee, Behold, I will deliver thine enemy into thine hand, that thou mayest do to him as it shall seem good unto thee. Then David arose, and cut off the skirt of Saul's robe privily." (1 Samuel 24:1-4 KJV)

Afterward, righteous David felt remorse for even damaging Saul's clothing because "The LORD forbid that I should do this thing unto my master, the LORD'S anointed, to stretch forth mine hand against him, seeing he is the anointed of the LORD" (see 1 Samuel 21: Why Didn't David Kill Saul?). David then courageous went out and faced Saul and his army with the plea "The LORD therefore be judge, and judge between me and thee, and see, and plead my cause, and deliver me out of thine hand."

"24:5 And it came to pass afterward, that David's heart smote him, because he had cut off Saul's skirt. 24:6 And he said unto his men, The LORD forbid that I should do this thing unto my master, the LORD'S anointed, to stretch forth mine hand against him, seeing he is the anointed of the LORD. 24:7 So David stayed his servants with these words, and suffered them not to rise against Saul. But Saul rose up out of the cave, and went on his way.

24:8 David also arose afterward, and went out of the cave, and cried after Saul, saying, My lord the king. And when Saul looked behind him, David stooped with his face to the earth, and bowed himself. 24:9 And David said to Saul, Wherefore hearest thou men's words, saying, Behold, David seeketh thy hurt? 24:10 Behold, this day thine eyes have seen how that the LORD had delivered thee to day into mine hand in the cave: and some bade me kill thee: but mine eye spared thee; and I said, I will not put forth mine hand against my lord; for he is the LORD'S anointed. 24:11 Moreover, my father, see, yea, see the skirt of thy robe in my hand: for in that I cut off the skirt of thy robe, and killed thee not, know thou and see that there is neither evil nor transgression in mine hand, and I have not sinned against thee; yet thou huntest my soul to take it. 24:12 The LORD judge between me and thee, and the LORD avenge me of thee: but mine hand shall not be upon thee. 24:13 As saith the proverb of the ancients, Wickedness proceedeth from the wicked: but mine hand shall not be upon thee.

24:14 After whom is the king of Israel come out? after whom dost thou pursue? after a dead dog, after a flea. 24:15 The LORD therefore be judge, and judge between me and thee, and see, and plead my cause, and deliver me out of thine hand." (1 Samuel 24:5-15 KJV)

The close-call incident apparently caused Saul to regain his sanity and reason. It didn't last, but for a brief time Saul broke off the pursuit and proclaimed "Thou art more righteous than I: for thou hast rewarded me good, whereas I have rewarded thee evil" and "And now, behold, I know well that thou shalt surely be king, and that the kingdom of Israel shall be established in thine hand."

"24:16 And it came to pass, when David had made an end of speaking these words unto Saul, that Saul said, Is this thy voice, my son David? And Saul lifted up his voice, and wept. 24:17 And he said to David, Thou art more righteous than I: for thou hast rewarded me good, whereas I have rewarded thee evil. 24:18 And thou hast shewed this day how that thou hast dealt well with me: forasmuch as when the LORD had delivered me into thine hand, thou killedst me not. 24:19 For if a man find his enemy, will he let him go well away? wherefore the LORD reward thee good for that thou hast done unto me this day. 24:20 And now, behold, I know well that thou shalt surely be king, and that the kingdom of Israel shall be established in thine hand. 24:21 Swear now therefore unto me by the LORD, that thou wilt not cut off my seed after me, and that thou wilt not destroy my name out of my father's house.

24:22 And David sware unto Saul. And Saul went home; but David and his men gat them up unto the hold." (1 Samuel 24:16-22 KJV)

Fact Finder: What does the Bible tell us about Engedi?
See Engedi In History And Prophecy


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This Day In History, April 10

428: Nestorius became the Patriarch of Constantinople (the city was named after Constantine; see Constantine's Crusades In History And Prophecy and A History Of Jerusalem: Constantine and Muhammad). Among the teachings of Nestorius was his rejection of the Church of Rome's title of Theotokos ("Mother of God") for the Virgin Mary (see What Does The Bible Really Say About Mary?).

879: Louis III and Carloman II become co-reigning kings of the Western Franks..

Europe
1512: James V of Scotland, who allied his country with France against the English, was born. He became king at the age of 17 months.

1606: The Charter of the Virginia Company of London was established by Royal Charter by James I of England (after whom the King James Version of the Bible is named) with the purpose of establishing English colonial towns and settlements in the wilderness of North America. The English investment and development continued for about 170 years until the rebellion by some of the colonists against the King who established and built their cities and civilization for them.

The United Empire Loyalists were patriotic conservatives (honest, hard-working, successful people of all walks of life i.e. farmers, merchants, tradesmen, educators) who moved to Canada from the New England colonies because they saw no need for a rebellion and were brutally persecuted by rebel forces. Totaling about 40% of the population of the New England colonies, they were later known as United Empire Loyalists. When the U.S. invaded Canada a few years later, in the War of 1812 (1812-1814), United Empire Loyalists and their adult children and grandchildren served among the British Army and Canadian militias that successfully defended Canada from U.S. annexation (the publicly-stated goal of U.S. President James Madison when he started the war).

A plaque in Hamilton, Ontario (as well as many others across Canada) commemorates the United Empire Loyalists:

United Empire Loyalists

"This monument is dedicated to the lasting memory of

THE UNITED EMPIRE LOYALISTS

Who, after the Declaration of Independence, came into British North America from the seceded American colonies and who, with faith and fortitude, and under great pioneering difficulties, largely laid the foundations of this Canadian nation as an integral part of the British Empire.

Neither confiscation of their property, the pitiless persecution of them by their kinsmen in revolt, nor the galling chains of imprisonment could break their spirits, or divorce them from a loyalty almost without parallel.

No country ever had such founders --

No country in the world --

No, not since the days of Abraham."

1741: Frederick II of Prussia defeated Maria Theresa's forces at Mollwitz and conquered Silesia.

1809: Austria declared war on France.

1814: Napoleon was defeated by the British and Spanish at the Battle of Toulouse. It resulted in Napoleon's abdication and exile to Elba.

1858: The original "Big Ben" bell for the Palace of Westminster was cast.

1864: Archduke Maximilian of Austria took the throne of Mexico.

1875: The Northwest Mounted Police (which later was included in the formation of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the "Mounties") received government authorization to build a post that would later become the city of Calgary.

1912: The Titanic set off on its first, and only, voyage.

1919: Revolutionary leader Emiliano Zapata was ambushed and killed by government troops in Mexico.

1922: The Genoa Conference opened to discuss the reconstruction of Europe after the First World War.

1932: In Germany, Paul von Hindenburg received 19 million votes in the presidential elections, beating, for the time being, Adolf Hitler's 13 million votes (see also Presidential Quotes On War, Terrorism, Religion).

1938: In a referendum, 99.75% of Austrians voted for a merger with Germany (Adolf Hitler was born in Austria).

1941: During the Second World War, U.S. troops occupied Greenland to block German military control of the north Atlantic island.

1944: During the Second World War (listen to our Sermon The European World Wars), a British mini-submarine entered Bergen harbor in Norway and sank the German ship Barenfels.

1945: The Allies liberated the Nazi concentration camp, Buchenwald. It is estimated that nearly 57,000 people (mostly Jews) were killed in its gas chambers during its 8 year existence.

1963: The U.S. atomic submarine Thresher was lost in the Atlantic off Cape Cod; the 129 crew were lost.

1972: More than 50 countries signed a treaty outlawing the stockpiling of biological weapons. As might be expected, the countries that already had the greatest stockpiles of such weapons refused to sign the treaty.

1974: Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir resigned over differences within her Labor Party. She was succeeded by Yitzhak Rabin.

1980: Britain and Spain agreed to reopen the border between Gibraltar and Spain, closed in 1969.

1989: Intel announced the release of the 80486 processor.

2010: A Polish Air Force Tu-154 crashed near Smolensk, Russia. Polish President Lech Kaczynski and 95 other people aboard the aircraft were killed.




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