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Tuesday, November 11 2014

Job 32: Elihu's Answer

"Also against his three friends was his wrath kindled, because they had found no answer, and yet had condemned Job"

The tribulation of Job (see How Did The Devil Challenge Job To Commit A Satan? and What Did Satan Do To Job's Soul?) also became a verbal trial of Job. Three of Job's friends came to comfort him (see A Friend In Deed), but they too became Job's accusers because they wrongly presumed that righteous Job's troubles were wrath from the LORD.

Elihu

"2:11 Now when Job's three friends heard of all this evil that was come upon him, they came every one from his own place; Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite: for they had made an appointment together to come to mourn with him and to comfort him. 2:12 And when they lifted up their eyes afar off, and knew him not, they lifted up their voice, and wept; and they rent every one his mantle, and sprinkled dust upon their heads toward heaven. 2:13 So they sat down with him upon the ground seven days and seven nights, and none spake a word unto him: for they saw that his grief was very great." (Job 2:11-13 KJV)

There were others present, apart from Job and his three elder friends. A young man, Elihu, was also there. Elihu was "the son of Barachel the Buzite, of the kindred of Ram." Elihu was a descendant of Abraham - as were the other friends (see Who Were Eliphaz, Bildad and Zophar?).

Elihu had listened to the entire discourse between Job and the men who became his accusers. He said nothing because "Elihu had waited till Job had spoken, because they were elder than he," but when they were done (see The Defense Rests), Elihu offered his uninvited answer - to all of them.

"32:1 So these three men ceased to answer Job, because he was righteous in his own eyes.

32:2 Then was kindled the wrath of Elihu the son of Barachel the Buzite, of the kindred of Ram: against Job was his wrath kindled, because he justified himself rather than God.

32:3 Also against his three friends was his wrath kindled, because they had found no answer, and yet had condemned Job.

32:4 Now Elihu had waited till Job had spoken, because they were elder than he. 32:5 When Elihu saw that there was no answer in the mouth of these three men, then his wrath was kindled.

32:6 And Elihu the son of Barachel the Buzite answered and said,

I am young, and ye are very old; wherefore I was afraid, and durst not shew you mine opinion. 32:7 I said, Days should speak, and multitude of years should teach wisdom. 32:8 But there is a spirit in man: and the inspiration of the Almighty giveth them understanding. 32:9 Great men are not always wise: neither do the aged understand judgment.

32:10 Therefore I said, Hearken to me; I also will shew mine opinion. 32:11 Behold, I waited for your words; I gave ear to your reasons, whilst ye searched out what to say. 32:12 Yea, I attended unto you, and, behold, there was none of you that convinced Job, or that answered his words: 32:13 Lest ye should say, We have found out wisdom: God thrusteth him down, not man. 32:14 Now he hath not directed his words against me: neither will I answer him with your speeches.

32:15 They were amazed, they answered no more: they left off speaking. 32:16 When I had waited, (for they spake not, but stood still, and answered no more;) 32:17 I said, I will answer also my part, I also will shew mine opinion. 32:18 For I am full of matter, the spirit within me constraineth me. 32:19 Behold, my belly is as wine which hath no vent; it is ready to burst like new bottles. 32:20 I will speak, that I may be refreshed: I will open my lips and answer. 32:21 Let me not, I pray you, accept any man's person, neither let me give flattering titles unto man. 32:22 For I know not to give flattering titles; in so doing my maker would soon take me away." (Job 32:1-22 KJV)

Fact Finder: Where did the principle of "innocent unless proven guilty" originate?
See Innocent Until Proven Guilty


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This Day In History, November 11

308: In an attempt to restore order to the unraveling Roman Empire, Emperor Diocletian met with Galerius, Augustus of the East, and Maximianus, the recently returned former Augustus of the West (see A History Of Jerusalem: Pompey And The Caesars). The Roman Roman Empire nevertheless fell and was superseded, historically and prophetically, by the "Holy Roman Empire Of The German Nation" (see The Holy Roman Empire Of The German Nation).

The Roman Empire

1100: King Henry I of England (the word "king" originated from a term that meant the head of a kin i.e. a family patriarch; the original meaning of "patriotism" was to be loyal to the king) married Matilda of Scotland, the daughter of Malcolm III of Scotland.

1417: Unity of the Church of Rome's papacy was recovered with the election of Martin V. The Great Western Schism, beginning in 1378, resulted in a pope in Rome, another in Avignon, France and a third established by the Council of Pisa (see The Struggle For The Papacy).

1500: Louis XII of France and Ferdinand of Aragon signed the secret Treaty of Granada for the conquest and partition of Naples.

1572: Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe observed a bright "new star" in Cassiopeia, shining as brightly as Venus. He continued to observe the super nova (a star which has exploded after all of its fuel has been used up) for 18 months as it slowly faded.

1606: A peace treaty was signed at Zeita-Torok between the Turks and Austrians.

1620: The Mayflower Compact was signed by the English pioneers who became known as the "Pilgrims" (to understand the actual Biblical meaning of "pilgrim," see The Pilgrims).

1673: Poland's King John Sobieski defeated the Turks at Korzim, Poland.

1805: The Battle of Durenstein during the Napoleonic Wars (named after Napoleon Bonaparte). 8,000 French troops attempted to slow the retreat of a much larger Russian and Austrian force.

1813: During the War of 1812 (1812-1814), 800 British troops, Canadian militia and natives repelled 4,000 U.S. invaders at the Battle of Chrysler's Farm near Cornwall, Ontario. Along with other defeats and stalemates during the previous months, it forced the U.S. to abandon their campaign of obliterating Canada as a nation and annexing Canadian territory into the U.S. (two actually-stated goals by U.S. President James Madison when he declared the start of the war in 1812).

1918: The armistice was signed to end The First World War in which over 10 million people were killed (listen to our Sermon The European World Wars).

1953: The polio virus was identified and photographed for the first time.

1971: The U.S. ratified a treaty to return the island of Okinawa to Japan (although the U.S. maintains large military bases in Japan to this day).

1972: The U.S. turned over its large base at Long Binh to the South Vietnamese, symbolizing the end of direct U.S. participation in the Vietnam Civil War.

1973: A cease-fire agreement was signed between Israel and Egypt (see also A History Of Jerusalem: War And Peace).

1975: The African nation of Angola became independent from Portugal.

1982: Polish "Solidarity" union leader Lech Walesa was released from 11 months of detention in a state-owned hunting lodge.

1992: The Church of England voted to allow women to be ordained as priests. Women were already allowed to become priests in 11 branches of the Anglican Church, including Canada and the U.S. (the Supreme Governor of the Church of England, the British Monarch, is also at the present time a woman, Queen Elizabeth II).


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