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Tuesday, October 13 2015

Jeremiah 47: Where Did The Palestinians Come From?

The Egyptian and Philistine people are cousins from their common ancestor, Mizraim, the son Noah's son of Ham

Righteous Noah (see Why Did The Flood Happen? and The LORD's Seed Covenants With The Two Men Of Iraq) had three sons, Shem, Ham and Japheth, from whom the primary families of present-day humanity originated (see The First Nations Of The New World).

Noah's son Ham then had four sons: Cush, Mizraim, Put, Canaan.

"1:8 The sons of Ham; Cush, and Mizraim, Put, and Canaan.

1:9 And the sons of Cush; Seba, and Havilah, and Sabta, and Raamah, and Sabtecha. And the sons of Raamah; Sheba, and Dedan.

1:10 And Cush begat Nimrod: he began to be mighty upon the earth.

1:11 And Mizraim begat Ludim, and Anamim, and Lehabim, and Naphtuhim, 1:12 And Pathrusim, and Casluhim, (of whom came the Philistines,) and Caphthorim." (1 Chronicles 1:8-12 KJV)

Canaanites obviously originated from Ham's son Canaan. But who originated from Ham's son Mizraim?

Palestinians Mizraim is the Hebrew name that was given to Egypt and northeast Africa by the Hebrew-speaking Israelites in reference to Mizraim's descendants who settled there. Mizraim is rendered into English as "Egypt" (from the name that the ancient Greek empire gave to it, pronounced Aigyptos; see The Cleopatra Connection) over 600 times in the Holy Scriptures. Various translations use "Mizraim" or "Egypt" interchangeably, as shown in the examples below from the King James Version and the Revised Standard Version.

"10:6 And the sons of Ham; Cush, and Mizraim, and Phut, and Canaan." (Genesis 10:6 KJV)

"10:6 The sons of Ham: Cush, Egypt, Put and Canaan." (Genesis 10:6 RSV)

As plainly documented in the verses above, the descendants of Mizrain were not Canaanites. Among the descendants of Mizraim / Egypt were, obviously, the Egyptians, but also the Philistines. The Egyptian and Philistine people are cousins from their common ancestor.

"1:11 And Mizraim begat Ludim, and Anamim, and Lehabim, and Naphtuhim, 1:12 And Pathrusim, and Casluhim, (of whom came the Philistines,) and Caphthorim." (1 Chronicles 1:11-12 KJV)

The name "Palestine" originated from the Greek word pronounced Palaistina, which is derived from the Hebrew word pronounced pel-eh-sheth, meaning land of the Philistines - a small coastal territory corresponding to what is today Gaza. It never truly meant anywhere else, or anywhere beyond their homeland borders.

The definition of Palestine was first inflated when the invading Romans (see A History Of Jerusalem: Pompey And The Caesars) used the name Syria Palaestina during the second century before Jesus Christ. They used it to designate the southern portion of their political province of Syria, which then took in Judea, including Jerusalem.

In modern times, the accepted meaning of Palestine was again greatly politically amplified after the First World War (1914-1918). Britain, which then held control of the land of Israel under a mandate of the League of Nations (British control eventually made possible the birth of the modern state of Israel, thereby fulfilling a vital Biblical element of Prophecy - see Israel In History and Prophecy: Balfour Declaration), revived the name as an official title for practically all of the land - from Dan to Beersheba, and from The Mediterranean Sea to the Jordan River. And so it has been ever since. Nevertheless, from the actual Biblical perspective, "Palestine," which is merely a different pronunciation of "Philistine," consisted only of the coastal area centered on what is today Gaza - a people whose origin and family is to the southwest, in Egypt - not to the east, in the land of Israel.

With its location along the "Fertile Crescent" (see Children Of Ham - The Origin Of Egypt And Iraq), Gaza was often involved in the conflicts, not merely with neighboring Israel, but with the great powers that marched back and forth through Gaza. So too, in the time of the prophet Jeremiah.

"47:1 The word of the LORD that came to Jeremiah the prophet against the Philistines, before that Pharaoh smote Gaza.

47:2 Thus saith the LORD;

Behold, waters rise up out of the north, and shall be an overflowing flood, and shall overflow the land, and all that is therein; the city, and them that dwell therein: then the men shall cry, and all the inhabitants of the land shall howl. 47:3 At the noise of the stamping of the hoofs of his strong horses, at the rushing of his chariots, and at the rumbling of his wheels, the fathers shall not look back to their children for feebleness of hands; 47:4 Because of the day that cometh to spoil all the Philistines, and to cut off from Tyrus and Zidon every helper that remaineth: for the LORD will spoil the Philistines, the remnant of the country of Caphtor. 47:5 Baldness is come upon Gaza; Ashkelon is cut off with the remnant of their valley: how long wilt thou cut thyself?

47:6 O thou sword of the LORD, how long will it be ere thou be quiet? put up thyself into thy scabbard, rest, and be still. 47:7 How can it be quiet, seeing the LORD hath given it a charge against Ashkelon, and against the sea shore? there hath he appointed it." (Jeremiah 47:1-7 KJV)

Fact Finder: How were the Philistines / "Palestinians" of Gaza involved in Bible history?
See Gaza In History And Prophecy


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This Day In History, October 13

1080: Heinrich (in English, Henry) VI of Germany was defeated by Rudolf of Rheinfelden at the Elster River; Rudolf was killed in the battle (see also The Holy Roman Empire Of The German Nation).

1211: Latin Emperor Henry of Flanders defeated the Nicaean emperor Theodore I Lascaris at the Battle of the Rhyndacus.

1529: Ottoman (Turkish) forces lifted their siege of Vienna, Austria. The military struggles through that time determined whether Europe would be Roman Catholic or Islamic (see A History Of Jerusalem: Constantine and Muhammad).

Soviet Missile 1582: The Gregorian calendar began in Italy and Spain. 10 days were skipped to correct the accumulated seasonal error of the Julian calendar - October 5 was followed by October 15, although the days of the week were not affected (see How Did Rome Change True Time?).

1764: Edward Gibbon observed a group of Church of Rome monks singing in the ruined Temple of Jupiter in Rome. The scene inspired him to begin work on his famous The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (see also A History Of Jerusalem: Pompey And The Caesars).

1783: In France, the Montgolfier brothers' hot air balloon achieved the first human ascent, by Jean-Fran├žois Pilatre de Rozier.

1815: After his defeat and capture by the British at the Battle of Waterloo the previous June, Napoleon Bonaparte arrived under guard at the island of St. Helena where he was held in exile until he died in 1821.

1839: Britain's Queen Victoria proposed marriage to her first cousin, Albert. The marriage between Victoria and Albert was promoted by their uncle Leopold I, king of the Belgians.

1894: Alfred Dreyfus, a Jewish officer in the French army, was arrested for treason, tried, found guilty and sentenced to life in prison on Devil's Island. He was proven innocent in 1930, 36 years after his conviction. The "Dreyfus Affair" became one of the most famous stories of French history.

1917: Mata Hari (actual name Margaretha Zelle), 41, a Dutch spy for Germany during the First World War, was executed by a French firing squad at the Vincennes Barracks outside Paris.

1945: Vichy French Premier Pierre Laval is executed by a firing squad for his wartime collaboration with the Germans.

1946: Hermann Goering, 53, high-ranking Nazi official under Adolf Hitler, committed suicide in his prison cell 2 hours before his scheduled hanging for war crimes (see also Presidential Quotes On War, Terrorism, Religion).

1962: Day 2 of the Cuban Missile Crisis. President John F. Kennedy was first shown spy-plane photographs taken the previous day of Soviet ballistic missile sites under construction in Cuba. Over the next 2 weeks, the U.S.-Soviet confrontation brought the world to the brink of nuclear war. Kennedy and his military advisors knew that Soviet nuclear ballistic missiles in Cuba were of no more threat to the U.S. than those 5,000 miles away in Russia (ballistic missiles can't be stopped, regardless of where they are launched from), or those off the U.S. east and west coasts on lurking Russian submarines (just as U.S. submarines lurk off the Russian coasts - along with the U.S. missiles in Europe, aimed at Russia), were no different than any Russian missiles in Cuba aimed at the U.S., however after the "Bay of Pigs" Cuban invasion failure, Kennedy feared that another embarrassment over Cuba would have been disastrous to his approval rating as President (as later documented by actual Kennedy associates, including Presidential advisor Theodore "Ted" Sorensen). According to his associates who were present, Kennedy took all of humanity to the brink of nuclear extinction to defend his personal re-election - an election that he never got to run in because he was killed a year later, not by the Russians, but by one of his own fellow citizens, a former U.S. Marine by the name of Lee Harvey Oswald.

1964: Nikita Khrushchev was ousted as First Secretary of the U.S.S.R. Communist Party. He was replaced by Leonid Brezhnev, and Alexi Kosygin as Prime Minister.

1970: Anwar Sadat became president of Egypt, succeeding Gamel Abdel Nasser.

1971: Iran (known until the 1920s as Persia) celebrated 2500 years as a nation. It was Persia that defeated the Babylonian Empire (see The Prophet Daniel: The Hand Writing On The Wall) and freed the people of Judah from their Babylonian captivity (see The Prophecies Of Cyrus of Persia).

1990: Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev won the Nobel Peace Prize for his removal of the Berlin Wall and the "Iron Curtain" in Europe.


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