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Wednesday, June 1 2016

Acts 1: The Messiah's View As He Ascended To Heaven

"Ye men of Galilee, why stand ye gazing up into heaven? This same Jesus, which is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come in like manner as ye have seen Him go into heaven"

The "Book" of Luke and the "Book" of Acts were written by Luke as epistles (letters) to a nobleman named Theophilus (see The Epistles: Luke and The Epistles: Acts).

The Gospel Book of Luke ends where the historic "Acts of the Apostles" begins - with the ascent of the Messiah to the Throne of God in heaven from Bethany, a town on the Mount of Olives near Jerusalem (see The Ascent From Bethany).

Israel From Space

"24:50 And he led them out as far as to Bethany, and he lifted up his hands, and blessed them. 24:51 And it came to pass, while he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven." (Luke 24:50-51 KJV)

1:9 And when he had spoken these things, while they beheld, he was taken up; and a cloud received him out of their sight ... 1:12 Then returned they unto Jerusalem from the mount called Olivet, which is from Jerusalem a sabbath day's journey." (Acts 1:9,12 KJV)

The satellite photograph shows what the Messiah would have seen as He ascended over the land of Israel that day - the same view that He will see on the day of His Return, as will those of the first resurrection who will rise to "meet the LORD in the air" that day (see Trumpets: The Prophecy Of The Return Of Jesus Christ).

"1:1 The former treatise have I made, O Theophilus, of all that Jesus began both to do and teach, 1:2 Until the day in which he was taken up, after that he through the Holy Ghost had given commandments unto the apostles whom he had chosen:

1:3 To whom also he shewed himself alive after his passion by many infallible proofs, being seen of them forty days, and speaking of the things pertaining to the kingdom of God: 1:4 And, being assembled together with them, commanded them that they should not depart from Jerusalem, but wait for the promise of the Father, which, saith he, ye have heard of me. 1:5 For John truly baptized with water; but ye shall be baptized with the Holy Ghost not many days hence.

1:6 When they therefore were come together, they asked of him, saying, Lord, wilt thou at this time restore again the kingdom to Israel?

1:7 And he said unto them, It is not for you to know the times or the seasons, which the Father hath put in his own power. 1:8 But ye shall receive power, after that the Holy Ghost is come upon you: and ye shall be witnesses unto me both in Jerusalem, and in all Judaea, and in Samaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth.

1:9 And when he had spoken these things, while they beheld, he was taken up; and a cloud received him out of their sight.

1:10 And while they looked stedfastly toward heaven as he went up, behold, two men stood by them in white apparel; 1:11 Which also said, Ye men of Galilee, why stand ye gazing up into heaven? this same Jesus, which is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come in like manner as ye have seen him go into heaven." (Acts 1:1-11 KJV)

The first order of business when the apostles returned to Jerusalem was the election of a replacement for the rebel Judas Iscariot (see Did Judas Iscariot Repent?).

"1:12 Then returned they unto Jerusalem from the mount called Olivet, which is from Jerusalem a sabbath day's journey. 1:13 And when they were come in, they went up into an upper room, where abode both Peter, and James, and John, and Andrew, Philip, and Thomas, Bartholomew, and Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus, and Simon Zelotes, and Judas the brother of James. 1:14 These all continued with one accord in prayer and supplication, with the women, and Mary the mother of Jesus, and with his brethren.

1:15 And in those days Peter stood up in the midst of the disciples, and said, (the number of names together were about an hundred and twenty,) 1:16 Men and brethren, this scripture must needs have been fulfilled, which the Holy Ghost by the mouth of David spake before concerning Judas, which was guide to them that took Jesus. 1:17 For he was numbered with us, and had obtained part of this ministry.

1:18 Now this man purchased a field with the reward of iniquity; and falling headlong, he burst asunder in the midst, and all his bowels gushed out. 1:19 And it was known unto all the dwellers at Jerusalem; insomuch as that field is called in their proper tongue, Aceldama, that is to say, The field of blood.

1:20 For it is written in the book of Psalms, Let his habitation be desolate, and let no man dwell therein: and his bishoprick let another take.

1:21 Wherefore of these men which have companied with us all the time that the Lord Jesus went in and out among us, 1:22 Beginning from the baptism of John, unto that same day that he was taken up from us, must one be ordained to be a witness with us of his resurrection.

1:23 And they appointed two, Joseph called Barsabas, who was surnamed Justus, and Matthias. 1:24 And they prayed, and said, Thou, Lord, which knowest the hearts of all men, shew whether of these two thou hast chosen, 1:25 That he may take part of this ministry and apostleship, from which Judas by transgression fell, that he might go to his own place. 1:26 And they gave forth their lots; and the lot fell upon Matthias; and he was numbered with the eleven apostles." (Acts 1:12-26 KJV)

Fact Finder: What happened when the Messiah arrived in heaven from the Mount of Olives?
See What Happened When The Messiah Arrived In Heaven?


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This Day In History, June 1

193: Roman Emperor Marcus Didius was assassinated in his palace (see also A History Of Jerusalem: Pompey And The Caesars, A History Of Jerusalem: The Herodian Dynasty, A History Of Jerusalem: Titus And The Zealots and A History Of Jerusalem: Hadrian and Simon bar Kokhba).

987: Hugh Capet was elected King of France.

1215: Ending the Battle of Beijing, the city was captured by Mongol forces under Genghis Khan (see also The Origin Of Gog And Magog and End-Time Gog And Magog).

1252: Alfonso X was elected King of Castile and Leon.

1609: In the wilderness of northeastern North America, Samuel de Champlain discovered (the native people already knew that the lake was there) the lake that was named after him - Lake Champlain (see also Thanksgiving In History and Prophecy).

1648: During the Second English Civil War, the Roundheads defeated the Cavaliers at the Battle of Maidstone.

1670: Charles II of England and Louis XIV of France signed the treaty of Dover (signed in Dover, England). It resulted in England becoming involved in the Third Anglo-Dutch War.

HMS Shannon 1679: The Scottish Covenanters defeated John Graham of Claverhouse at the Battle of Drumclog.

1813: During the War of 1812 (1812-1814), James Lawrence, the wounded commander of the USS Chesapeake (a 38 gun frigate with a crew of 340), uttered his famous final order, "Don't give up the ship!" while in a naval battle with the Royal Navy HMS Shannon (a 38 gun frigate with a crew of 330). The crew gave up the ship anyway; the USS Chesapeake was captured by the Shannon and taken to Halifax, Nova Scotia where it entered service as the Royal Navy warship HMS Chesapeake.

Britain's wars in North America (the New England Rebellion of 1776, and the War of 1812-1814 that was declared by U.S. President James Madison with the publicly-stated goal of conquering Canada) were fought at the same time as far-greater wars all across Europe i.e. the wars to stop Napoleon Bonaparte from conquering Europe and Russia - that ended in the famous Battle of Waterloo (in present-day Belgium) in June of 1815. Only a small fraction of Britain's Royal Army, Navy and Marines were diverted to the colonial wars of 1776 and 1812 in North America.

1816: The rivalry between the North West Company and the Hudson's Bay Company erupted in violence in the Battle of Seven Oaks. While attempting to transport supplies, Metis allies of the North West Company clashed with 21 men from the Hudson's Bay Company post in Red River Colony, now Winnipeg. Robert Semple, governor for the Hudson's Bay Company, most of his party and 1 Metis were killed. The incident led to the eventual merger of the two companies.

1831: Sir James Ross discovered the position of the north magnetic pole.

1861: The first skirmish of the U.S. Civil War took place, at the Fairfax Court House in Virginia.

1867: Viscount Monck became the first Governor General of Canada. He had held the position in British North America and his term was to have expired in 1866, but Queen Victoria extended his appointment to give him the honor of being the first Governor General of the free, civilized democracy that he helped to create.

1915: Germany made the first zeppelin air raid over England.

1941: British forces entered Baghdad and returned the regent, six year-old King Faisal, to power (see also A History Of Jerusalem: The British Mandate).

1958: During the political crisis created by the civil war in Algeria, Charles De Gaulle became premier of France with the power to rule by decree for six months; a new constitution was drawn up, and in 1959 De Gaulle became the first president of "The Fifth Republic."

1961: The incinerated ashes of captured Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann were dumped into the sea outside the 3 mile territorial limit of Israel. He had been hung by the Israelis the day before.

1963: King Victor Emmanual III of Italy became Emperor of Ethiopia.

1963: In defiance of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling 10 days earlier that Alabama's segregation laws were unconstitutional, Alabama governor George Wallace stood at a school door and stopped black teenagers from court-ordered integration of the University of Alabama. President Kennedy responded by using federal troops to force integration.

1974: The new "Heimlich Maneuver" for saving choking victims was published in the journal Emergency Medicine.

1980: Cable News Network (CNN) began operation.

1991: Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines erupted for the first time in 600 years.

2009: General Motors filed for bankruptcy.


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