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Tuesday, September 13 2016

1 Timothy 3: Bishops And Deacons: What Should They Do?

"As the steward of God; not selfwilled"

The English-language word "bishop" originated from the ancient Anglo-Saxon word biscop. The Anglo-Saxon word was used to translate the Greek word that meant an overseer.

Bishops were the elders (or "presbyters") who were given the responsibility for congregations. The key point about them is that the people weren't answerable to the Bishop - the Bishop was answerable to the LORD. Bishops were to be true "leaders," not mere pushers (see Leaders And Pushers).

A Dove

"1:7 For a bishop must be blameless, as the steward of God; not selfwilled, not soon angry, not given to wine, no striker, not given to filthy lucre; 1:8 But a lover of hospitality, a lover of good men, sober, just, holy, temperate; 1:9 Holding fast the faithful word as he hath been taught, that he may be able by sound doctrine both to exhort and to convince the gainsayers." (Titus 1:7-9 KJV)

The English-language words "deacon" and "deaconess" were derived from the Greek word diaconos, meaning a servant. The original term was used for servants, with no church designation, however the apostles adopted the term for individuals who were given the responsibility of taking care for practical matters within the congregation (see Why Were They Called Deacons?).

The origin of the Biblical "deacons" (i.e. servants):

"6:1 And in those days, when the number of the disciples was multiplied, there arose a murmuring of the Grecians against the Hebrews, because their widows were neglected in the daily ministration. 6:2 Then the twelve called the multitude of the disciples unto them, and said, It is not reason that we should leave the word of God, and serve tables. 6:3 Wherefore, brethren, look ye out among you seven men of honest report, full of the Holy Ghost and wisdom, whom we may appoint over this business. 6:4 But we will give ourselves continually to prayer, and to the ministry of the word.

6:5 And the saying pleased the whole multitude: and they chose Stephen, a man full of faith and of the Holy Ghost, and Philip, and Prochorus, and Nicanor, and Timon, and Parmenas, and Nicolas a proselyte of Antioch: 6:6 Whom they set before the apostles: and when they had prayed, they laid their hands on them.

6:7 And the word of God increased; and the number of the disciples multiplied in Jerusalem greatly; and a great company of the priests were obedient to the faith." (Acts 6:1-7 KJV)

The apostle Paul gave one of the Holy Bible's most-concise statements about who could be a bishop or deacon - and moerover, why: "As the steward of God; not selfwilled."

"3:1 This is a true saying, If a man desire the office of a bishop, he desireth a good work. 3:2 A bishop then must be blameless, the husband of one wife, vigilant, sober, of good behaviour, given to hospitality, apt to teach; 3:3 Not given to wine, no striker, not greedy of filthy lucre; but patient, not a brawler, not covetous; 3:4 One that ruleth well his own house, having his children in subjection with all gravity; 3:5 (For if a man know not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the church of God?) 3:6 Not a novice, lest being lifted up with pride he fall into the condemnation of the devil. 3:7 Moreover he must have a good report of them which are without; lest he fall into reproach and the snare of the devil.

3:8 Likewise must the deacons be grave, not doubletongued, not given to much wine, not greedy of filthy lucre; 3:9 Holding the mystery of the faith in a pure conscience. 3:10 And let these also first be proved; then let them use the office of a deacon, being found blameless.

3:11 Even so must their wives be grave, not slanderers, sober, faithful in all things.

3:12 Let the deacons be the husbands of one wife, ruling their children and their own houses well. 3:13 For they that have used the office of a deacon well purchase to themselves a good degree, and great boldness in the faith which is in Christ Jesus.

3:14 These things write I unto thee, hoping to come unto thee shortly: 3:15 But if I tarry long, that thou mayest know how thou oughtest to behave thyself in the house of God, which is the church of the living God, the pillar and ground of the truth. 3:16 And without controversy great is the mystery of godliness:

God was manifest in the flesh, justified in the Spirit, seen of angels, preached unto the Gentiles, believed on in the world, received up into glory." (1 Timothy 3:1-16 KJV)

Fact Finder: What should "ministers" do?
See What Does The Bible Say About Ministers? and Disciples, Ministers, Apostles, Prophets


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This Day In History, September 13

585 BC: Lucius Tarquinius Priscus, the king of Rome (see also The Politics Of Rome), defeated the Sabines.

509 BC: The pagan temple of Jupiter ("enlightened" scientists of the modern world named a planet after that pagan god) on Rome's Capitoline Hill (see also Israel In History and Prophecy: Aelia Capitolina) was dedicated on the ides of September (the term ides was used for the 15th day of the Roman months of March, May, July and October, and the 13th day of the other months).

81: The Roman Emperor Titus (reigned 79-81) died at age 42. As a military commander before succeeding his father Vespasian, it was Titus who conducted the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple in 70 A.D. (see A History Of Jerusalem: Titus And The Zealots and What Did Jesus Christ Say About Those Stones?).

122: Construction began of Hadrian's Wall in Britain during the time the island was under Roman occupation. Named after the emperor Hadrian (reigned 117-138), parts of the 120 kilometer (75 mile) wall remain visible today. Roman legions were occupying Britain at the same time that they occupied the land of Israel when Christ was crucified (see A History Of Jerusalem: Hadrian and Simon bar Kokhba and Legions Of Men And Angels).

Roman Britian

335: The Roman Emperor Constantine consecrated Rome's "Church of the Holy Sepulchre" in Jerusalem. Constantine was the creator of the Papacy and numerous of the Church of Rome's doctrines, most of which are also perpetuated by the "Protestant" churches (see Constantine's Crusades In History And Prophecy and A History Of Jerusalem: Constantine and Muhammad).

533: The Battle of Ad Decimium, near Carthage in North Africa. General Belisarius of the Byzantine Empire defeated Gelimer and the Vandals (the term "vandalism" originated from the ancient Vandals who looted cities that they conquered).

1321: Italian playwright Dante Alighieri died. His farce Divine Comedy was the inspiration for much of the Vatican's development of the false doctrine of an ever-burning hell fire (see The Lake Of Fire Into An Ocean Of Fire - When?) and the non-existent Purgatory.

1515: King Francis of France battled the Swiss army under Cardinal Matthias Schiner at Marignano in northern Italy.

1549: Pope Paul III ended the first session of the Council of Bologna.

1609: Henry Hudson entered what would later be named New York harbor and claimed the area for Holland (Hudson was working for the Dutch at the time).

1759: The Battle of The Plains of Abraham, fought at the western edge of Quebec City, overlooking the St. Lawrence River. The English under James Wolfe, 32, defeated the French under the Marquis de Montcalm, 47, ending the "French and Indian Wars" and settling the political future of Canada. Both leaders were killed. The place is named for Abraham Martin, a ship's pilot who owned part of the land.

Quebec City Cannons

1788: New York City (both the city and the state were originally named after England's 17th century Duke of York, James Stuart, who became King James II of England in 1685) was declared the first federal capital of the U.S.

1922: The highest recorded shade temperature, 58 degrees Celsius / 136 degrees Fahrenheit, was recorded at Al Aziziyah, Libya.

1941: Elias Disney, the Canadian father of Walt Disney (his mother was a German immigrant), died at age 82.

1942: During the Second World War (1939-1945), the German army began its all-out attack on Stalingrad against stiff Soviet resistance.

1961: NASA launched into orbit, and later recovered, an unmanned Project Mercury capsule in preparation for the first U.S. manned orbital flight (the Russians were the first to launch a man into space - Yuri Gagarin, earlier that year, on April 12 1961), which took place the next February by John Glenn (Glenn was the third human to orbit the earth).

Cosmonauts

1991: Russia and the U.S. agreed to cut off arms supplies to the warring tribes in Afghanistan (both took their turn at invading and attempting to install puppet regimes Afghanistan - Russia in 1979, the U.S. in 2001).





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Copyright © Wayne Blank