. Make a Donation

Index Page
Contact
About The Author
Sermons
Bible Quiz
Holy Day Calendar
Free Online Bibles
Bible Reading Plan

Question?
Quick Search the thousands of Bible studies on this website.
Just type in topic word(s) or a question.
Get Daily Bible Study on Facebook
Get Daily Bible Study on Twitter
Friday, September 23 2016

Titus 3: The Scales Of Mercy And Grace

"According to His mercy He saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost; Which He shed on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Saviour; That being justified by His grace, we should be made heirs according to the hope of eternal life"

The English-language word "mercy" originated from an ancient Latin word, mercedis, that had a deeper meaning than that of simply forgiving something that was done as though it never happened. The original word meant to take all things into account - the reason that the words mercantile, merchant and market all originated from the same word as mercy. "Mercy" was granted to those who, on balance, did more good than bad (see Christ Died For Repentant Sinners and The Law Of The Mercy Seat).

The LORD's Mercy isn't a free pass.

Scales

As often happened with numerous other words, the single English-language word "mercy" is used to translate more than one original Hebrew word of the Holy Scriptures - in this case, two of them. Notice however that both apply to someone who is turning to the right way (see Which Way Is Right And Left? and Strait And Straight).

  • The Hebrew word, pronounced kheh-sed, which means kindness, with the applied meaning of acceptance of those who make the effort to walk with you.

  • The Hebrew word, pronounced rawkh-awm, which means compassion, with the applied meaning of acceptance of those who are growing, as in a child's learning as it grows.

The English-language word "grace" originated from a Greek word, pronounced khar-eese (a hint of the source pronunciation of "grace" is audible in khar-eese), which meant to rejoice (grateful, gratitude and agree are all derived from the same source as grace). "Grace" is used to translate that same word, from which it was derived, in the Holy Scriptures.

Grace is a state of being grateful for the forgiveness that comes, from the LORD (see The Identity Of The LORD God and The LORD God Our Saviour), when one truly repents and genuinely lives according to God's Law, rather than Satan's loser ways of rebellion and perversion.

The principle of true grace is the same as that of true mercy. Grace is not about being ungrateful ("ungraceful") by doing nothing good, or blasphemously claiming that grace makes humans "free" of obedience to God (see Jude: Ungodly Men Who Turn Grace Into Lawlessness and Blaspheming The Name Of God):

"6:1 What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound?

6:2 God forbid.

How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein?

6:3 Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death? [Baptism is a portrayal of death, burial and resurrection of repentant people] 6:4 Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life." (Romans 6:1-4 KJV)

Notice how the apostle Paul explained the measures of mercy and grace in the lives of those who have turned from Satan's lawless laws (see Iniquity In History And Prophecy) to the Way of Eternal Life.

"3:1 Put them in mind to be subject to principalities and powers, to obey magistrates, to be ready to every good work, 3:2 To speak evil of no man, to be no brawlers, but gentle, shewing all meekness unto all men.

3:3 For we ourselves also were sometimes foolish, disobedient, deceived, serving divers lusts and pleasures, living in malice and envy, hateful, and hating one another. 3:4 But after that the kindness and love of God our Saviour toward man appeared, 3:5 Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost; 3:6 Which he shed on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Saviour; 3:7 That being justified by his grace, we should be made heirs according to the hope of eternal life. 3:8 This is a faithful saying, and these things I will that thou affirm constantly, that they which have believed in God might be careful to maintain good works. These things are good and profitable unto men.

3:9 But avoid foolish questions, and genealogies, and contentions, and strivings about the law; for they are unprofitable and vain. 3:10 A man that is an heretick after the first and second admonition reject; 3:11 Knowing that he that is such is subverted, and sinneth, being condemned of himself.

3:12 When I shall send Artemas unto thee, or Tychicus, be diligent to come unto me to Nicopolis: for I have determined there to winter. 3:13 Bring Zenas the lawyer and Apollos on their journey diligently, that nothing be wanting unto them. 3:14 And let ours also learn to maintain good works for necessary uses, that they be not unfruitful.

3:15 All that are with me salute thee. Greet them that love us in the faith. Grace be with you all. Amen.

It was written to Titus, ordained the first bishop of the church of the Cretians, from Nicopolis of Macedonia." (Titus 3:1-15 KJV)

Fact Finder: When will those who received the LORD's mercy and grace be saved?
See Who Can Be Saved?


Bible Quiz Daily Bible Study Library
Thousands of Studies!

Jesus Christ
Bible History
Prophecy
Christian Living
Encouragement
Eternal Life
By The Book
Bible Places
Curiosities
The Spirit World

This Day In History, September 23

63 BC: Gaius Octavius, commonly known today as Octavian, was born. A grand-nephew of Julius Caesar, Octavian, with the official name Caesar Augustus, was the first emperor of the Roman empire (see A History Of Jerusalem: Pompey And The Caesars). He reigned from 31 B.C. to 14 A.D., which covered the birth and early life of Jesus Christ. Augustus is mentioned in the Bible (see Does Rome Have Christ's Birth Certificate?).

Augustus

1122: The Concordat of Worms ("Worms" is the English rendering of the name of the German city Vorms) was signed between Roman Catholic Pope Callistus II and Holy Roman Emperor Henry V (a German king). The agreement ended the Investiture Controversy - a centuries-long (and not-yet-done) power struggle between the German emperor and Catholic pope (see The Holy Roman Empire Of The German Nation and Emperors and Popes).

1338: The Battle of Arnemuiden became the first naval battle of the Hundred Years' War and the first naval battle using artillery. The English ship Christofer was armed with three cannons.

1459: The Battle of Blore Heath, the first major battle of the English Wars of the Roses.

1553: The Sadians became the rulers of Morocco in opposition to the Ottomans (listen to our Sermon The Ottoman Empire).

1578: English explorer Sir Humphrey Gilbert sailed from Plymouth, England, in search of the Northwest Passage. The passage was not actually found until 3 centuries later. Sir Humphrey Gilbert did however make a greater discovery, as shown below.

Sir Humphrey Gilbert

1723: The site of present-day Toronto was purchased from the Mississauga Indians.

1817: Britain and Spain signed a treaty to end the slave trade.

1846: The 8th planet from the sun was discovered by astronomers at Berlin University. A British astronomer had earlier calculated the presence of the planet, but it was not searched for at Cambridge until after the German discovery. We know the planet today by the pagan name Neptune.

1905: Norway and Sweden signed the Karlstad treaty, thereby ending their national political union.

1913: Roland Garros of France became the first to fly in an airplane across the Mediterranean Sea.

1939: The famous Austrian psychiatrist Sigmund Freud died at age 83.

1941: During the Second World War (1939-1945), the first Nazi gas chamber experiments were conducted at the Auschwitz concentration camp (the gas chamber was not a Nazi invention; the U.S. began using it as a means of execution in 1924).

1972: Martial law was declared in the Philippines by Ferdinand Marcos.

1973: Juan Peron was re-elected as President of Argentina (he was overthrown in 1955). His wife, Evita, became the Vice President.

2004: Hurricane Jeanne killed over 1,000 people in Haiti.



editionDBSx201702et

Copyright © Wayne Blank