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Sunday, April 16 2017

Who Vandalized The Menorah?

"Now there was about this time Jesus, a wise man, if it be lawful to call him a man, for he was a doer of wonderful works, a teacher of such men as receive the truth with pleasure. He drew over to him both many of the Jews, and many of the Gentiles"

The English-language rendering of "Menorah" is from the Hebrew word pronounced men-oh-raw. The Menorah was the seven-branched lampstand that was originally made for use in the Tabernacle (see The Seven Lamps Of The Lampstand and The First Christian Tabernacle), according to command of the LORD God (Who was and is Jesus Christ; see A Biography Of Jesus Christ: The LORD God Of Creation) as given to Moses.

Menorah The King James Version translates the original Hebrew word as "candlestick," even though it had olive-oil lamps, not candles. The Revised Standard Version more-accurately translates it as "lampstand," while the Complete Jewish Bible uses the English rendering of the Hebrew word, "menorah."

"25:31 And thou shalt make a candlestick of pure gold: of beaten work shall the candlestick be made: his shaft, and his branches, his bowls, his knops, and his flowers, shall be of the same." (Exodus 25:31 King James Version)

"25:31 "And you shall make a lampstand of pure gold. The base and the shaft of the lampstand shall be made of hammered work; its cups, its capitals, and its flowers shall be of one piece with it" (Exodus 25:21 Revised Standard Version)

"25:31 You are to make a menorah of pure gold. It is to be made of hammered work; its base, shaft, cups, ring of outer leaves and petals are to be of one piece with it." (Exodus 25:31 Complete Jewish Bible)

Later, the Temple in Jerusalem also had the specified-use lampstand - which was lost in 70 AD when the Romans destroyed Jerusalem and the Temple (see the photograph below of the Arch of Titus). The works of Titus Flavius Josephus, more popularly-known simply as Josephus, are an independent eyewitness account of the Truth found in the Holy Bible - including direct references to Jesus Christ, outside of the Bible itself, such as these from Josephus' Jewish Antiquities.

"Now there was about this time Jesus, a wise man, if it be lawful to call him a man, for he was a doer of wonderful works, a teacher of such men as receive the truth with pleasure. He drew over to him both many of the Jews, and many of the Gentiles. He was the Christ, and when Pilate, at the suggestion of the principal men among us, had condemned him to the cross, those that loved him at the first did not forsake him; for he appeared to them alive again the third day; as the divine prophets had foretold these and ten thousand other wonderful things concerning him. And the tribe of Christians so named from him are not extinct at this day."

The historical record by Josephus of the fall of Jerusalem is an eyewitness account of the fulfillment of the prophecy of it given by Jesus Christ nearly forty years earlier e.g. Christ's "There shall not be left here one stone upon another, that shall not be thrown down" of Matthew 24:2 was actually witnessed by Josephus with his description "the battering rams began their thundering work."

An excerpt from Josephus' The Wars Of The Jews:

"Nero died after having reigned thirteen years and eight days, and Vespasian, being informed of the event, waited for a whole year, holding his army together instead of proceeding against Jerusalem. Galba was made emperor, and then, after the defeat and death of the emperor Vitellius, Vespasian was proclaimed by the East. He had preferred to leave the Jews to waste their strength by their internal feuds while he sent his lieutenants with forces to reduce various surrounding districts instead of attacking Jerusalem. When he became emperor, he released Josephus from his bonds, honouring him for his integrity. Hastening his journey to Rome, Vespasian commanded Titus to subdue Judea.

At Jerusalem were now three factions raging furiously. Eleazar, son of Simon, who was the first cause of the war, by persuading the people to reject the offerings of the emperors to the Temple, and had led the Zealots and seized the Temple, pretended to cherish righteous wrath against John of Gischala for the bloodshed he had occasioned. But he deserted the Zealots and seized the inner court of the Temple, so that there was war between him and Simon, son of Gioras. Thus Eleazar, John and Simon each led a band in constant fightings, and the Temple was everywhere defiled by murders.

Josephus Now, as Titus was on his march he chose out 600 select horsemen, and went to take a view of the city, when suddenly an immense multitude burst forth from the gate over against the monuments of Queen Helena and intercepted him and a few others. He had on neither helmet nor breastplate, yet though many darts were hurled at him, all missed him, as if by some purpose of Providence and, charging through the midst of his foes, he escaped unhurt. Part of the army now advanced to Scopos, within a mile of the city, while another occupied a station at the foot of the Mount of Olives.

Seeing this gathering of the Roman forces, the factions within Jerusalem for the first time felt the necessity for concord, as Eleazar from the summit of the Temple, John from the porticoes of the outer court, and Simon from the heights of Sion watched the Roman camps forming thus so near the walls. Making terms with each other, they agreed to make an attack at the same moment. Their followers, rushing suddenly forth along the valley of Jehoshaphat, fell on the 10th legion, encamped at the foot of the Mount of Olives, and working there unarmed at the entrenchments. The soldiers fell back, many being killed. Witnessing their peril, Titus, with picked troops, fell on the flank of the Jews and drove them into the city with great loss.

The Roman commander now carefully pushed forward his approaches, and the army took up a position all along the northern and the western walls, the footmen being drawn up in seven lines, with the horsemen in three lines behind, and the archers between.

Jerusalem was fortified by three walls. These were not one within the other, for each defended one of the quarters into which the city was divided. The first, or outermost, encompassed Bezetha, the next protected the citadel of the Antonia and the northern front of the Temple, and the third, or old, and innermost wall was that of Sion. Many towers, 35 feet high and 35 feet broad, each surmounted with lofty chambers and with great tanks for rain water, guarded the whole circuit of the walls, 90 being in the first wall, 14 in the second, and 60 in the third. The whole circuit of the city was about 33 stadia (four miles). From their pent-houses of wicker the Romans, with great toil day and night, discharged arrows and stones, which slew many of the citizens.

At three different places the battering rams began their thundering work, and at length a corner tower came down, yet the walls stood firm, for there was no breach. Suddenly the besieged sallied forth and set fire to the engines. Titus came up with his horsemen and slew twelve Jews with his own hands.

The Jews now retreated to the second wall, abandoning the defence of Bezetha, which the Romans entered. Titus instantly ordered the second wall to be attacked, and for five days the conflict raged more fiercely than ever. The Jews were entirely reckless of their own lives, sacrificing themselves readily if they could kill their foes. On the fifth day they retreated from the second wall, and Titus entered that part of the lower city which was within it with 1,000 picked men.

The Judean Antiquities But, being desirous of winning the people, he ordered that no houses should be set on fire and no massacres should be committed. The seditious, however, slew everyone who spoke of peace, and furiously assailed the Romans. Some fought from the walls, others from the houses, and such confusion prevailed that the Romans retired; then the Jews, elated, manned the breach, making a wall of their own bodies.

Thus the fight continued for three days, till Titus a second time entered the wall. He threw down all the northern part and strongly garrisoned the towers of the south. The strong heights of Sion, the citadel of the Antonia, and the fortified Temple still held out. Titus, eager to save so magnificent a place, resolved to refrain for a few days from the attack, in order that the minds of the besieged might be affected by their woes, and that the slow results of famine might operate. He reviewed his army in full armour, and they received their pay in view of the city, the battlements being thronged by spectators during this splendid defiling, who looked on in terror and dismay.

The famine increased, and the misery of the weaker was aggravated by seeing the stronger obtaining food. All natural affection was extinguished, husbands and wives, parents and children snatching the last morsel from each other. Many wretched men were caught by the Romans prowling in the ravines by night to pick up food and these were scourged, tortured and crucified. This was done to terrify the rest, and it went on till there was not wood enough for crosses.

Terrible crimes were committed in the city. The aged high-priest, Matthias, was accused of holding communication with the enemy. Three of his sons were killed in his presence, and he was executed in sight of the Romans, together with sixteen other members of the sanhedrin. The famine grew so woeful that a woman devoured the body of her own child. At length, after fierce fighting, the Antonia was scaled, and Titus ordered its demolition.

Titus now promised that the Temple should be spared if the defenders would come forth and fight in any other place, but John and the Zealots refused to surrender it. For several days the outer cloisters and outer court were attacked with rams, but the immense and compact stones resisted the blows. As many soldiers were slain in seeking to storm the cloisters, Titus ordered the gates to be set on fire. Through that night and the next day the flames raged through the cloisters. Then, in order to save the Temple itself, he ordered the fire to be quenched. On the tenth of August, the same day of the year on which Nebuchadnezzar destroyed the Temple built by Solomon, the cry was heard that the Temple was on fire. The Jews, with cries of grief and rage, grasped their swords and rushed to take revenge on their enemies or perish in the ruins.

The slaughter was continued while the fire raged. Soon no part was left but a small portion of the outer cloisters, where 6,000 people had taken refuge, led by a false prophet who had there promised that God would deliver His people in His Temple. The soldiers set the building on fire and all perished. Titus next spent eighteen days in preparations for the attack on the upper city, which was then speedily captured. And now the Romans were not disposed to display any mercy, night alone putting an end to the carnage. During the whole of this siege of Jerusalem, 1,100,000 were slain, and the prisoners numbered 97,000."

The Romans themselves made a historic documentation of their looting of the Temple in Jerusalem on the famous Arch of Titus that was constructed shortly after the event. Included in their takings from Jerusalem was the Menorah, as clearly shown.

The Arch of Titus

The Roman Empire, like all empires before and since, eventually fell from its presumed and self-declared "leading" of other nations. The weakened by corruption and moral perversions Romans themselves were then invaded in their homeland, just as they had done to others for centuries. Among those fierce and battle-smart opponents were the Vandals, a Germanic tribe who typically invaded and looted other nations - the modern-day term "vandalism" originated from the ancient Vandals.

Many believe that the Menorah and other Temple articles are still in Rome, as documented by the Arch of Titus. But the vandals looted Rome, just as the Romans had looted Jerusalem. The artwork below portrays an interesting possibility - the Vandals taking the Menorah away from Rome to their homelands in northern and eastern Europe.

The Sack Of Rome By The Vandals

Fact Finder: How are a "lampstand" and "olive trees" involved in the Messiah's return?
See The Lampstand And Olive Trees Of The Messiah's Return


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This Day In History, April 16

1457 BC: The estimated date of a Battle of Megiddo (an ancient "battle of Armageddon"; see also The Battles Of Megiddo) between Thutmose III of Egypt and a Canaanite coalition under the King of Kadesh (see also What Does The Bible Really Say About Canaanites?).

69: Roman emperor Otho committed suicide at age 37 after being defeated by Vitellius' troops at Bedriacum (see A History Of Jerusalem: Pompey And The Caesars and Ancient Empires - Rome).

73: Masada fell to the Romans after several months of siege, ending the Jewish Revolt (see A History Of Jerusalem: Titus And The Zealots).

masada

1065: The Norman Robert Guiscard took Bari, ending 5 centuries of Byzantine rule in southern Italy.

1175: Holy Roman Emperor Frederick I ended the siege of Alessandria and signed the Treaty of Montebello with the Lombard League (see The Holy Roman Empire Of The German Nation).

1521: Martin Luther, 34, arrived at the Diet of Worms (i.e. "Worms" is the English rendering for Vorms, a city in Germany), where he defended his "Ninety-Five Theses," first advanced in 1517. At the Diet (a term for a legislative assembly used some countries, "Diet" derived from the Latin word for day), Luther refused to recant his rebellion against the Papacy (while at the same time, Luther kept nearly all of the Papacy's antichrist doctrines, as do most "Protestants" to this day - see Antichristians and Is Your Religion Your Religion?; also The Cross Of Christ, Or The Cross Of Men? and Christ Died For Repentant Sinners).

1542: The Sieur de Roberval, France's first viceroy in Canada, sailed for the New World with 3 ships and 200 colonists. He explored the St. Lawrence as far as Montreal Island, searching for the legendary kingdom of Saguenay. The expedition returned to France in 1543.

1582: Spanish conquistador Hernando de Lerma founded the settlement of Salta, Argentina.

1705: Queen Anne knighted Isaac Newton at Trinity College.

1746: Forces under the Duke of Cumberland fought the Jacobite Scots under Prince Charles Edward at the Battle of Culloden, near Inverness, Scotland.

1780: The University of Munster in Munster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany was founded.

1818: After the U.S. failed to obliterate the Canadian people as a nation and annex Canadian territory into the U.S. (the publicly-stated goal of U.S. President James Madison when he declared the start of the War of 1812 - that ended in 1814 with British Marines burning the White House and Madison fleeing the city with his army, in retaliation for the U.S. burning and looting of the Parliament Building in Toronto earlier that year), the U.S. Senate ratified the Rush-Bagot Treaty, establishing the border with Canada that remains to this day nearly 200 years later.

The United Empire Loyalists were conservatives (honest, hard-working, successful people of all walks of life i.e. farmers, merchants, tradesmen, educators) who moved to Canada from the New England colonies because they saw no need for a rebellion and were brutally persecuted by rebel forces. Totaling about 40% of the population of the New England colonies, they were later known as United Empire Loyalists.
When the U.S. invaded Canada a few years later, in the War of 1812 (1812-1814), United Empire Loyalists and their adult children and grandchildren served among the British Army and Canadian militias that successfully defended Canada from more U.S. aggression and annexation ("The formal act of acquiring territory by conquest or occupation" - the publicly-stated goal of U.S. President James Madison when he started the war).

United Empire Loyalists

A plaque in Hamilton, Ontario (as well as many others across Canada) commemorates the United Empire Loyalists:

"This monument is dedicated to the lasting memory of

THE UNITED EMPIRE LOYALISTS

Who, after the Declaration of Independence, came into British North America from the seceded American colonies and who, with faith and fortitude, and under great pioneering difficulties, largely laid the foundations of this Canadian nation as an integral part of the British Empire.

Neither confiscation of their property, the pitiless persecution of them by their kinsmen in revolt, nor the galling chains of imprisonment could break their spirits, or divorce them from a loyalty almost without parallel.

No country ever had such founders --

No country in the world --

No, not since the days of Abraham."

1856: The Declaration of Paris was signed. It recognized the principle of free ships and free goods and defined contraband and blockade.

1912: Harriet Quimby became the first woman to fly across the English Channel, from Dover to Hardelot.

1942: The Island of Malta was awarded the George Cross in recognition for heroism under constant German air attack during the Second World War. It was the first such award given to any part of the British Commonwealth.

1947: Bernard Baruch, a U.S.-Jewish financier, originated the term "Cold War" to describe the relationship between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R.

1953: The British royal yacht Britannia was launched, just months before Queen Elizabeth's coronation. The ship served the monarchy for 45 years before being decommissioned in 1998.

1982: Queen Elizabeth proclaimed Canada's new constitution, ending the last colonial links with Britain - the Kingdom that gave Canada birth and defended it for 2 centuries.

Canada

1995: Canada and the European Union settled a dispute over fishing rights in the north Atlantic after weeks of tense negotiations. The incident began when a Canadian Coast Guard ship fired upon and arrested a Spanish ship on the high seas.

2007: The Virginia Tech Massacre, one of the deadliest shooting sprees in U.S. history - 32 killed, 23 wounded. The gunman committed suicide.





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Copyright © Wayne Blank