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Monday, September 10 2018

A Bible Journey, 25: The Passing Of Abraham

"And these are the days of the years of Abraham's life which he lived, an hundred threescore and fifteen years"

After Abraham became a widower from the death of Sarah (see A Bible Journey, 18: The Promise To Sarah), he "took a wife, and her name was Keturah."

Keturah had six sons of Abraham: "Zimran, and Jokshan, and Medan, and Midian, and Ishbak, and Shuah" (Midian was the progenitor of the Midianites; centuries later, Moses married a Midianite, Zipporah, the daughter of Jethro, "the priest of Midian" - see Moses And Zipporah).

Abraham also had children with concubines. While Isaac inherited the responsibility and purpose of Abraham's Messianic presence in Canaan, the sons of Keturah and "unto the sons of the concubines, which Abraham had, Abraham gave gifts, and sent them away from Isaac his son, while he yet lived, eastward, unto the east country." They thereafter became many of the "Arab" nations of today (see also A Bible Journey, 17: A Father Of Many Nations and What Does The Bible Say About Arabs?).

An Arab Chieftan

"25:1 Then again Abraham took a wife, and her name was Keturah. 25:2 And she bare him Zimran, and Jokshan, and Medan, and Midian, and Ishbak, and Shuah. 25:3 And Jokshan begat Sheba, and Dedan. And the sons of Dedan were Asshurim, and Letushim, and Leummim. 25:4 And the sons of Midian; Ephah, and Epher, and Hanoch, and Abida, and Eldaah. All these were the children of Keturah.

25:5 And Abraham gave all that he had unto Isaac. 25:6 But unto the sons of the concubines, which Abraham had, Abraham gave gifts, and sent them away from Isaac his son, while he yet lived, eastward, unto the east country." (Genesis 25:1-6 KJV)

Elderly Abraham died and was buried with Sarah in the tomb at Hebron (see A Bible Journey, 23: The Hebron Sepulchre).

"25:7 And these are the days of the years of Abraham's life which he lived, an hundred threescore and fifteen years.

25:8 Then Abraham gave up the ghost, and died in a good old age, an old man, and full of years; and was gathered to his people.

25:9 And his sons Isaac and Ishmael buried him in the cave of Machpelah, in the field of Ephron the son of Zohar the Hittite, which is before Mamre; 25:10 The field which Abraham purchased of the sons of Heth: there was Abraham buried, and Sarah his wife.

25:11 And it came to pass after the death of Abraham, that God blessed his son Isaac; and Isaac dwelt by the well Lahairoi." (Genesis 25:7-11 KJV)

As the LORD promised to Hagar (see A Bible Journey, 16: Hagar's Journey), her son of Abraham was greatly blessed, "And they dwelt from Havilah unto Shur, that is before Egypt, as thou goest toward Assyria" (see the Fact Finder question below).

"25:12 Now these are the generations of Ishmael, Abraham's son, whom Hagar the Egyptian, Sarah's handmaid, bare unto Abraham:

25:13 And these are the names of the sons of Ishmael, by their names, according to their generations:

The firstborn of Ishmael, Nebajoth; and Kedar, and Adbeel, and Mibsam, 25:14 And Mishma, and Dumah, and Massa, 25:15 Hadar, and Tema, Jetur, Naphish, and Kedemah:

25:16 These are the sons of Ishmael, and these are their names, by their towns, and by their castles; twelve princes according to their nations.

25:17 And these are the years of the life of Ishmael, an hundred and thirty and seven years: and he gave up the ghost and died; and was gathered unto his people.

25:18 And they dwelt from Havilah unto Shur, that is before Egypt, as thou goest toward Assyria: and he died in the presence of all his brethren." (Genesis 25:12-18 KJV)

Abraham, and the LORD, had chosen a wife for Isaac. Their choice was Rebekah (see A Bible Journey, 24: Isaac and Rebekah).

"25:19 And these are the generations of Isaac, Abraham's son: Abraham begat Isaac:

25:20 And Isaac was forty years old when he took Rebekah to wife, the daughter of Bethuel the Syrian of Padanaram, the sister to Laban the Syrian." (Genesis 25:19-20 KJV)

Some believe that Cain and Abel were twins i.e. that "Adam knew Eve his wife; and she conceived, and bare Cain, and said, I have gotten a man from the LORD. And she again bare his brother Abel" describes the birth of twins, first Cain, and the Abel immediately after (see What Proof Is There That Cain And Abel Were Twins? and A Bible Journey, 4: Thy Brother's Blood). Whether the few Biblical conflicts between twins began with Cain and Abel is debatable, but it was surely evident in Jacob and Esau.

Jacob and Esau

"25:21 And Isaac intreated the LORD for his wife, because she was barren: and the LORD was intreated of him, and Rebekah his wife conceived. 25:22 And the children struggled together within her; and she said, If it be so, why am I thus? And she went to enquire of the LORD.

25:23 And the LORD said unto her, Two nations are in thy womb, and two manner of people shall be separated from thy bowels; and the one people shall be stronger than the other people; and the elder shall serve the younger.

25:24 And when her days to be delivered were fulfilled, behold, there were twins in her womb. 25:25 And the first came out red, all over like an hairy garment; and they called his name Esau. 25:26 And after that came his brother out, and his hand took hold on Esau's heel; and his name was called Jacob: and Isaac was threescore years old when she bare them." (Genesis 25:21-26 KJV)

Although twins, they were fraternal, not identical - in appearance or personality. Their differences were further aggravated by blatant parental favoritism: "Isaac loved Esau, because he did eat of his venison: but Rebekah loved Jacob."

"25:27 And the boys grew: and Esau was a cunning hunter, a man of the field; and Jacob was a plain man, dwelling in tents.

25:28 And Isaac loved Esau, because he did eat of his venison: but Rebekah loved Jacob." (Genesis 25:27-28 KJV)

As the firstborn son, the "birthright" naturally belonged to Esau. The famous incident where Esau sold it to Jacob for a bowl of stew marked the time when the sibling rivalry between Jacob and Esau began to turn deadly - another Cain and Abel in the making, if, their mother Rebekah had not parted them.

"25:29 And Jacob sod pottage: and Esau came from the field, and he was faint: 25:30 And Esau said to Jacob, Feed me, I pray thee, with that same red pottage; for I am faint: therefore was his name called Edom.

25:31 And Jacob said, Sell me this day thy birthright.

25:32 And Esau said, Behold, I am at the point to die: and what profit shall this birthright do to me?

25:33 And Jacob said, Swear to me this day; and he sware unto him: and he sold his birthright unto Jacob.

25:34 Then Jacob gave Esau bread and pottage of lentiles; and he did eat and drink, and rose up, and went his way: thus Esau despised his birthright." (Genesis 25:29-34 KJV)

Fact Finder: How did all of the sons of Abraham fulfill the "from the Nile to the Euphrates" prophecy?
See Abraham's Seed: From The Nile To The Euphrates


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This Day In History, September 10

210 BC: Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of a unified China, died at age 49 (see also For All The Tea In China and The First Chinese American War).

China

506: The Church of Rome bishops of Visigothic Gaul met in the Council of Agde (see also Constantine's Crusades In History And Prophecy).

1419: John the Fearless, Duke of Burgundy was assassinated by followers of the Dauphin, the future Charles VII of France.

1224: The first Franciscan missionaries arrived in England. The Roman Catholic monks, also then known as "Grey Friars," were founded by Francis of Assisi 15 years before. England officially split with the papacy during the time of King Henry VIII (reigned 1509-1547), who established himself, and all future monarchs right to the present day, as head of the Church of England.

1419: John the Fearless, Duke of Burgundy, was assassinated by followers of the Dauphin, the future Charles VII of France.

1547: The Battle of Pinkie Cleugh, the last full scale battle between England and Scotland, resulted in a decisive victory for Edward VI.

1588: Thomas Cavendish returned to England, thereby becoming the third captain, with his crew, to circumnavigate the Earth.

Thomas Cavendish

1823: Simon Bolivar was declared President of Peru.

Simon BolĂ­var

1846: Elias Howe patented his "sewing machine," a device that permitted greater industrial production of clothing at lower cost.

1897: The Lattimer Mine Massacre: At a coal mine in Pennsylvania, a sheriff's "posse" (from the ancient Latin posse comitatus, in effect meaning posing as official) killed 19 unarmed striking miners; dozens more were wounded.

1898: Empress Elizabeth of Austria was assassinated by Luigi Lucheni, an Italian anarchist (see also The Assassination That Triggered Two World Wars).

1912: Jules Vedrines of France became the first pilot to achieve a speed of 100 miles per hour in flight.

Another Frenchman, Clement Ader, flew his steam-engine powered aircraft in 1890, while the Wright brothers did not fly their gasoline-engine powered aircraft at Kitty Hawk until 1903, 13 years later. The Wright brothers were the first to fly in the U.S. - they were not the first to fly in the world. The word "aviation" itself originated from the French name (meaning to fly like a bird) of Ader's aircraft, the Avion (see Who Was The First To Fly?).

First Flight

1914: The six-day Battle of the Marne ended during the First World War (1914-1918; see also The Assassination That Triggered Two World Wars), halting the German advance into France.

1918: During the Russian Civil War, the Red Army captured Kazan (see also When Do Liberals Become Conservatives? and Why Are Politicians Called Left Or Right?).

1939: At the beginning of the Second World War (1939-1945), Canada declared war on Nazi Germany, joining the United Kingdom and France.

1948: US-born Mildred Gillars, accused of being Nazi wartime radio broadcaster "Axis Sally," was indicted in Washington, D.C., for treason (see also The Art Of War and Fake News - News, Or Noose?). She was convicted of treason in 1949 and sentenced to 10 to 30 years in prison. When she was paroled in 1961, after being converted to Roman Catholicism while in prison, she went to live in a Convent in Ohio. She died in 1988.

1952: The Treaty of Luxembourg was signed between Israel and Germany, whereby Germany agreed to make reparation payments to Israel for German crimes against the Jews in during the Second World War. Conrad Adenauer signed for Germany. Ironically (as news events in the coming years will plainly show), the ceremony was held at the Luxembourg City Hall, a site dictated by Adenauer's presence that day to initial the pact establishing the European Coal and Steel Community - one of the first steps that led to the formation of the new, but ancient, European Union.

1963: U.S. President John Kennedy federalized Alabama's National Guard to prevent Governor George Wallace from using guardsmen to stop public-school desegregation. 20 black students were enabled to enter college that year.

1967: The people of Gibraltar voted to remain a British dependency rather than becoming part of Spain.

2002: Switzerland, a traditionally a "neutral" country, became a member of the United Nations.

2003: Anna Lindh, the foreign minister of Sweden, was fatally stabbed while shopping.

2007: Former Prime Minister of Pakistan Nawaz Sharif returned to Pakistan after seven years in exile.

2008: The Large Hadron Collider at CERN, described as the biggest scientific experiment in history, was powered up in Geneva, Switzerland.





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