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Wednesday, November 7 2018

A Bible Journey, 67: Water From The Rock In Rephidim

"And the LORD said unto Moses, Go on before the people, and take with thee of the elders of Israel; and thy rod, wherewith thou smotest the river, take in thine hand, and go. Behold, I will stand before thee there upon the rock in Horeb; and thou shalt smite the rock, and there shall come water out of it, that the people may drink. And Moses did so in the sight of the elders of Israel"

The Israelites could have been in the Promised Land only a little more than a year after the Exodus (see A Bible Journey, 63: The Exodus Lesson), but due to their refusal to enter the Promised Land, the LORD (see The Real Jesus: The Word Of The LORD God and A Bible Journey, 56: The Sacred Name) sentenced them to wander in circles in the Sinai wilderness for forty years, until the adult rebel generation of the Exodus had all died off (see Deuteronomy: The Law and History Lessons By Moses).

Sinai

The Israelites had become so habitually dependant upon their slave masters to feed and water them that they expected to have someone to continue to do so after their liberation i.e. "Wherefore the people did chide with Moses, and said, Give us water that we may drink."

"17:1 And all the congregation of the children of Israel journeyed from the wilderness of Sin, after their journeys, according to the commandment of the LORD, and pitched in Rephidim: and there was no water for the people to drink. 17:2 Wherefore the people did chide with Moses, and said, Give us water that we may drink.

And Moses said unto them, Why chide ye with me? wherefore do ye tempt the LORD?" (Exodus 17:1-2 KJV)

As they would do many times, with threats to kill Moses, they "murmured against Moses" (the reason that murmer and murder sound alike is because "murmering" means to speak in a threatening tone).

"17:3 And the people thirsted there for water; and the people murmured against Moses, and said, Wherefore is this that thou hast brought us up out of Egypt, to kill us and our children and our cattle with thirst?" (Exodus 17:3 KJV)

"Moses cried unto the LORD, saying, What shall I do unto this people? they be almost ready to stone me," so the LORD provided the means for them to find the water that was available to them (see the Fact Finder question below).

A Desert Oasis

"17:4 And Moses cried unto the LORD, saying, What shall I do unto this people? they be almost ready to stone me.

17:5 And the LORD said unto Moses, Go on before the people, and take with thee of the elders of Israel; and thy rod, wherewith thou smotest the river, take in thine hand, and go. 17:6 Behold, I will stand before thee there upon the rock in Horeb; and thou shalt smite the rock, and there shall come water out of it, that the people may drink. And Moses did so in the sight of the elders of Israel. 17:7 And he called the name of the place Massah, and Meribah, because of the chiding of the children of Israel, and because they tempted the LORD, saying, Is the LORD among us, or not?" (Exodus 17:4-7 KJV)

The LORD then also provided enemies for the Israelites to relieve some of their hostility - while teaching them to defend themselves. With miraculous help, the Israelites were victorious.

"17:8 Then came Amalek, and fought with Israel in Rephidim. 17:9 And Moses said unto Joshua, Choose us out men, and go out, fight with Amalek: to morrow I will stand on the top of the hill with the rod of God in mine hand.

17:10 So Joshua did as Moses had said to him, and fought with Amalek: and Moses, Aaron, and Hur went up to the top of the hill. 17:11 And it came to pass, when Moses held up his hand, that Israel prevailed: and when he let down his hand, Amalek prevailed. 17:12 But Moses' hands were heavy; and they took a stone, and put it under him, and he sat thereon; and Aaron and Hur stayed up his hands, the one on the one side, and the other on the other side; and his hands were steady until the going down of the sun. 17:13 And Joshua discomfited Amalek and his people with the edge of the sword.

17:14 And the LORD said unto Moses, Write this for a memorial in a book, and rehearse it in the ears of Joshua: for I will utterly put out the remembrance of Amalek from under heaven.

17:15 And Moses built an altar, and called the name of it Jehovahnissi: 17:16 For he said, Because the LORD hath sworn that the LORD will have war with Amalek from generation to generation." (Exodus 17:8-16 KJV)

Fact Finder: How does water "come out of the rock"? Where does it come from?
See How Did The Flood Happen?


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This Day In History, November 7

680: The Sixth Ecumenical Council began in Constantinople. The city was named after the Roman Emperor Constantine, who created the antichrist Church of Rome and many of its anti-Biblical doctrines (see Emperor Constantine's Sun Dogs and Constantine's Crusades In History And Prophecy).

1492: The Ensisheim meteorite, the oldest meteorite with a known date of impact, struck the Earth in a wheat field outside the village of Ensisheim, Alsace, France (see also When Space Rocks Collide With Earth).

1619: Elizabeth of Scotland and England was crowned Queen of Bohemia.

1659: The Treaty of the Pyrenees was signed, ending the Franco-Spanish War of 1648-1689.

1665: The London Gazette, the oldest surviving journal, was first published.

1775: John Murray (formally known as Lord Dunmore), a nobleman of Scotland who served as the Royal Governor of the Colony of Virginia, started the first emancipation of slaves in North America by issuing Lord Dunmore's Offer of Emancipation. The program was stopped by the leaders of the New England revolution, most of whom were and remained slave owners through their entire lives e.g. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson were lifetime slave holders, including after proclaiming "freedom" and "all men are created equal" for themselves.

John Murray

Washington Slaves

1783: The last person was publicly burned by the Spanish Inquisition.

Ferdinand and Isabella

1804: Napoleon Bonaparte declared himself emperor, thus ending the First Republic of France ("emperor" is an ancient Roman term that merely means that the leader of one country declares himself the leader of other people's countries, usually by invasion; see Russia Or Europe - Who Has Been The Invader?).

Napoleon

1837: Elijah Lovejoy, a prominent U.S. anti-slavery publisher, was killed by a mob while attempting to defend his newspaper's press.

1867: The first Parliament of Canada opened in Ottawa. The introductory throne speech was delivered by Governor General Lord Monck to Canada's first Prime Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, and his newly-elected cabinet.

Parliament of Canada

1885: The "Last Spike" of the Canadian Pacific Railway completed Canada's first transcontinental national railway.

1917: British forces under Edmund Allenby defeated the Ottomans during the Third Battle of Gaze. With Beersheba already under their control, the way was then open for the British advance for the liberation of Jerusalem (see A History Of Jerusalem: The British Mandate).

Allenby

1917: The Bolshevik Revolution began; communists under Vladimir Lenin overthrew the provisional government of Alexander Kerensky in Petrograd.

1921: Benito Mussolini became the leader of the Italian "conservative" Fascist Party (see Is Iniquity Liberal Or Conservative?). He became the primary European ally of Adolf Hitler during the Second World War (1919-1945). At the end of the war, Mussolini, 61, and his mistress Clara Petacci, 33, were executed by a mob of Italian people who then hung the bodies upside down with meat hooks at a service station.

Hitler

1938: Ernst von Rath, the third secretary of the German Embassy in Paris, was murdered by 17 year-old German-Jewish refugee, Herschel Grynszpan, whose father had been among 10,000 Jews deported to Poland in boxcars shortly before; the retaliatory killing was used as an excuse by Adolf Hitler (see Presidential Quotes On War, Terrorism, Religion) to trigger the anti-Jewish "Kristallnacht" in Germany 2 days later.

1956: The United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution calling upon Britain, France and Israel to withdraw their troops from Egypt.

Suez Crisis

1973: The U.S. and Egypt announced restoration of full diplomatic links for the first time since the 1967 Six Day War (see A History Of Jerusalem: War And Peace).

2000: The Presidential election between George W. Bush and Al Gore, one of the most contested and controversial elections in the history of the U.S.; Gore won the popular vote of millions of U.S. voters, while Bush won a U.S. Supreme Court decision of 9 judges that in effect declared Bush the winner (for which many critics claimed that the "Republicans on the Supreme Court decided the election").





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