. .


. Make a Donation

Index Page
Contact
About The Author
Sermons
Bible Quiz
Holy Day Calendar
Free Online Bibles
Bible Reading Plan

Question?
Quick Search the thousands of Bible studies on this website.
Just type in topic word(s) or a question.
Get Daily Bible Study on Facebook
Get Daily Bible Study on Twitter
Monday, April 22 2019

A Bible Journey, 177: The Bondage Generation

"Joseph placed his father and his brethren, and gave them a possession in the land of Egypt, in the best of the land, in the land of Rameses, as Pharaoh had commanded ... there arose up a new king over Egypt, which knew not Joseph. And he said unto his people, Behold, the people of the children of Israel are more and mightier than we ... Therefore they did set over them taskmasters to afflict them with their burdens"

The family of Israel (see A Bible Journey, 46: The Family At The Heart Of A Nation) were welcomed into Egypt - an acceptance that saved their very lives from a great famine and drought. The Prime Minister of Egypt (second in authority only to the king) at that time was Joseph, one of the Israelite patriarchs (see A Bible Journey, 45: I Am Your Brother Joseph).

"47:11 And Joseph placed his father and his brethren, and gave them a possession in the land of Egypt, in the best of the land, in the land of Rameses, as Pharaoh had commanded. 47:12 And Joseph nourished his father, and his brethren, and all his father's household, with bread, according to their families." (Genesis 47:11-12 KJV)

Egypt "47:27 And Israel dwelt in the land of Egypt, in the country of Goshen; and they had possessions therein, and grew, and multiplied exceedingly." (Genesis 47:27 KJV)

Over the next four centuries (the great famine that they fled from in the land of Canaan lasted only a few years), the Israelites, rather than returning to the land of Canaan, chose to remain in the well-watered Nile Delta region of Egypt.

The Israelites prospered and grew so much in Goshen, while born there generation after generation, but nevertheless remaining apart, that a centuries later king of Egypt began to fear the powerful multitude of political and religious aliens in their midst (see Exodus 1: I Will There Make Of Thee A Great Nation). It should be kept in mind that the harsh treatment and economic slavery suffered by the Israelites happened only for a few years, during the reign of just one Pharaoh.

"1:8 Now there arose up a new king over Egypt, which knew not Joseph. 1:9 And he said unto his people, Behold, the people of the children of Israel are more and mightier than we: 1:10 Come on, let us deal wisely with them; lest they multiply, and it come to pass, that, when there falleth out any war, they join also unto our enemies, and fight against us, and so get them up out of the land.

1:11 Therefore they did set over them taskmasters to afflict them with their burdens. And they built for Pharaoh treasure cities, Pithom and Raamses. 1:12 But the more they afflicted them, the more they multiplied and grew. And they were grieved because of the children of Israel. 1:13 And the Egyptians made the children of Israel to serve with rigour: 1:14 And they made their lives bitter with hard bondage, in morter, and in brick, and in all manner of service in the field: all their service, wherein they made them serve, was with rigour."

The numerous references to the Israelites being "bondmen" ("slaves") to Egypt actually refers only to the generation of Exodus. The Israelites were free and very wealthy in Egypt for centuries before the Exodus. That is the actual context (i.e. "thou shalt remember that thou wast a bondman in the land of Egypt" - that one, at-the-time generation) of those applications of the Law of the LORD (Who was and is Jesus Christ; see The Real Jesus: The Word Of The LORD God and A Bible Journey, 56: The Sacred Name).

Further examples of their direct relationship (see also A Bible Journey, 176: When The LORD Walks In The Camp):

"24:1 When a man hath taken a wife, and married her, and it come to pass that she find no favour in his eyes, because he hath found some uncleanness in her: then let him write her a bill of divorcement, and give it in her hand, and send her out of his house. 24:2 And when she is departed out of his house, she may go and be another man's wife. 24:3 And if the latter husband hate her, and write her a bill of divorcement, and giveth it in her hand, and sendeth her out of his house; or if the latter husband die, which took her to be his wife; 24:4 Her former husband, which sent her away, may not take her again to be his wife, after that she is defiled; for that is abomination before the LORD: and thou shalt not cause the land to sin, which the LORD thy God giveth thee for an inheritance.

The Nile River 24:5 When a man hath taken a new wife, he shall not go out to war, neither shall he be charged with any business: but he shall be free at home one year, and shall cheer up his wife which he hath taken.

24:6 No man shall take the nether or the upper millstone to pledge: for he taketh a man's life to pledge.

24:7 If a man be found stealing any of his brethren of the children of Israel, and maketh merchandise of him, or selleth him; then that thief shall die; and thou shalt put evil away from among you.

24:8 Take heed in the plague of leprosy, that thou observe diligently, and do according to all that the priests the Levites shall teach you: as I commanded them, so ye shall observe to do. 24:9 Remember what the LORD thy God did unto Miriam by the way, after that ye were come forth out of Egypt.

24:10 When thou dost lend thy brother any thing, thou shalt not go into his house to fetch his pledge. 24:11 Thou shalt stand abroad, and the man to whom thou dost lend shall bring out the pledge abroad unto thee. 24:12 And if the man be poor, thou shalt not sleep with his pledge: 24:13 In any case thou shalt deliver him the pledge again when the sun goeth down, that he may sleep in his own raiment, and bless thee: and it shall be righteousness unto thee before the LORD thy God.

24:14 Thou shalt not oppress an hired servant that is poor and needy, whether he be of thy brethren, or of thy strangers that are in thy land within thy gates: 24:15 At his day thou shalt give him his hire, neither shall the sun go down upon it; for he is poor, and setteth his heart upon it: lest he cry against thee unto the LORD, and it be sin unto thee.

24:16 The fathers shall not be put to death for the children, neither shall the children be put to death for the fathers: every man shall be put to death for his own sin.

24:17 Thou shalt not pervert the judgment of the stranger, nor of the fatherless; nor take a widow's raiment to pledge: 24:18 But thou shalt remember that thou wast a bondman in Egypt, and the LORD thy God redeemed thee thence: therefore I command thee to do this thing.

24:19 When thou cuttest down thine harvest in thy field, and hast forgot a sheaf in the field, thou shalt not go again to fetch it: it shall be for the stranger, for the fatherless, and for the widow: that the LORD thy God may bless thee in all the work of thine hands. 24:20 When thou beatest thine olive tree, thou shalt not go over the boughs again: it shall be for the stranger, for the fatherless, and for the widow. 24:21 When thou gatherest the grapes of thy vineyard, thou shalt not glean it afterward: it shall be for the stranger, for the fatherless, and for the widow. 24:22 And thou shalt remember that thou wast a bondman in the land of Egypt: therefore I command thee to do this thing." (Deuteronomy 24:1-22 KJV)

Fact Finder: Where were nearly all of the Israelites who entered the Promised land born? Why?
See Hometowns: Campsites Of The Sinai and A Bible Journey, 154: How The Rebellion Changed History and A Bible Journey, 155: Their Journey Back To Egypt Today


.
Bible Quiz Daily Bible Study Library
Thousands of Studies!

Jesus Christ
Bible History
Prophecy
Christian Living
Encouragement
Eternal Life
By The Book
Bible Places
Curiosities
The Spirit World

This Day In History, April 22

238: The Year of the Six Emperors (see also The Roman Emperors: Domitian). The Roman Senate outlawed emperor Maximinus Thrax and nominated two of its own Senators, Pupienus and Balbinus, to the throne of Rome (see The Roman Republic and The Roman Empire; also The Roman Border Walls Paradox).

The Roman Empire

1124: Alexander I, king of Scotland, died. King from 1107, he was succeeded by his brother David.

Britain

1145: The 19th recorded passage of what is now known as Halley's Comet (see also Creation Day 2: The Heaven Above, The Waters Below and Creation Day 7: The Week And The Christian Sabbath).

Comet Halley

1370: Construction began of the Bastille, a medieval fortress on the east side of Paris, at the order of Charles V.

Bastille

1500: Portuguese explorer Pedro Alvares Cabral, on a voyage to India, sailed far to the southwest and discovered Brazil, claiming it for Portugal. The land was first sighted earlier that year by a Spanish explorer, Vincente Yanes Pinzon, but he failed to claim it for Spain.

1509: Henry VIII ascended to the throne of England.

1519: Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes established a "settlement" (i.e. a garrison) at Veracruz, Mexico.

1529: The Treaty of Saragossa, which divided Spanish and Portuguese interests in the Pacific Ocean, was signed.

1793: Prior to the U.S. becoming an aggressive imperial power itself (the U.S. has become even more of what it claims to have been founded against), U.S. President George Washington, a former British Army officer in Virginia (see the official portrait below), issued a Proclamation of Neutrality for the U.S. to not become involved in the imperial wars between France and Britain.

Washington discovered that France agitated and supported the rebellion of the New England colonies for no other reason than to reduce the British military presence in North America, so that France could eventually widen its own colonies in and from Louisiana in the south and eastern Canada in the north (see the map below). France had no interest in anyone's "freedom" (while aiding the rebellion of the New England colonies, France tolerated no independence in any of its own colonies in North America).

One of the strangest ironies of Washington's political legacy is that the capital city that is named after Washington became a worldwide symbol of the very same colonial imperialism that Washington declared was wrong - when he wasn't in charge of it (see also When Do Liberals Become Conservatives? and What Did A Father Of Democracy Predict About It? ).

George Washington

New France

1834: The Quadruple Alliance was formed by Britain, France, Portugal and Spain, supporting Isabella II's claim to the Spanish throne against Don Carlos.

1838: The British steamship Sirius became the first to cross the Atlantic from Britain to New York solely on steam power. The journey from Cork to New York took 18 days, 10 hours.

1889: Territory in Oklahoma, formerly the free lands of native American (the "Indians" didn't have a concept of owning land), was opened to white settlers. About 50,000 settlers rushed in on the first day (see also The First Chinese American War).

1912: Pravda, the "voice" of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, began publication in Saint Petersburg.

1915: The Battle of Ypres (in Belgium) began. It was the first major battle for Canadian troops in the First World War (1914-1918; see also The Assassination That Triggered Two World Wars. The Germans released chlorine gas (the first use in warfare), forcing the unprepared French army to retreat. The 1st Canadian Division and British troops rushed to halt the German advance. It took a week of fierce fighting and counterattacks involving more gas before the German attack was brought to a halt.

Vimy

1933: Frederick Henry Royce, co-founder of the English auto company Rolls-Royce, died.

1944: The British 1st Air Commando Group, using Sikorsky R-4 helicopters, became the first to use helicopters in combat.

1948: During the Israeli War of Independence (the "1948 Arab-Israeli War"), Haifa, the major port of Israel, was captured from Arab forces (see A History Of Jerusalem: The British Mandate, A History Of Jerusalem: Zionism and A History Of Jerusalem: War And Peace).

1991: Intel released the 486sx processor.

1994: Richard Nixon, who resigned the office of U.S. president due to the Watergate criminal investigations, died at age 81 (see also The Impeachment Of The President).

2005: Philip Morrison died at age 89. He was a prominent member of the "Manhattan Project" that developed the U.S. atomic bombs that incinerated Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan (see also Who Would Throw A Nuclear Boomerang?). Morrison later became popularly known from his book and PBS series entitled The Ring Of Truth.

Hiroshima

Nagasaki





editionDBSx201702et

Copyright © Wayne Blank