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Monday, May 13 2013

The Capture Of Jerusalem

Jerusalem is one of the world's most ancient cities (see the Jerusalem series of studies in the Fact Finder question below). While most people today regard it as an Israelite city (which it is, according to the Command of the LORD), it only became an Israelite city in the time of King David, after the Civil War (see Israel In History and Prophecy: The Civil War). Prior to that time, the city was known as Jebus, a city of the Jebusites, a Canaanite people (see also Camped Out In Canaan). It was actually recorded, in hindsight, by Israelite historians as "Jerusalem" before it became Jerusalem (although "Salem" was already part of its designation). Notice in this example, in the time of the Judges (an era of about three centuries between the time of Joshua and the time when David became king; see Israel In History and Prophecy: The Judges), a Benjamin refused to stay in Jerusalem because it was a foreign city to Israel i.e. "Come, I pray thee, and let us turn in into this city of the Jebusites, and lodge in it ... And his master said unto him, We will not turn aside hither into the city of a stranger, that is not of the children of Israel; we will pass over to Gibeah."

The Temple

"19:9 And when the man rose up to depart, he, and his concubine, and his servant, his father in law, the damsel's father, said unto him, Behold, now the day draweth toward evening, I pray you tarry all night: behold, the day groweth to an end, lodge here, that thine heart may be merry; and to morrow get you early on your way, that thou mayest go home.

19:10 But the man would not tarry that night, but he rose up and departed, and came over against Jebus, which is Jerusalem; and there were with him two asses saddled, his concubine also was with him.

19:11 And when they were by Jebus, the day was far spent; and the servant said unto his master, Come, I pray thee, and let us turn in into this city of the Jebusites, and lodge in it.

19:12 And his master said unto him, We will not turn aside hither into the city of a stranger, that is not of the children of Israel; we will pass over to Gibeah. 19:13 And he said unto his servant, Come, and let us draw near to one of these places to lodge all night, in Gibeah, or in Ramah.

19:14 And they passed on and went their way; and the sun went down upon them when they were by Gibeah, which belongeth to Benjamin.

19:15 And they turned aside thither, to go in and to lodge in Gibeah: and when he went in, he sat him down in a street of the city: for there was no man that took them into his house to lodging." (Judges 19:9-15 KJV)

During the Civil War, David's capital was at Hebron, south of Jerusalem, while Saul's capital was at Gibeah, north of Jerusalem. David and Saul never fought at or for Jerusalem. After the war however, the LORD (see The Kingdom Of The LORD God) directed David to make Jerusalem the capital, not only of Judah, but of all of Israel.

"5:1 Then came all the tribes of Israel to David unto Hebron, and spake, saying, Behold, we are thy bone and thy flesh.

5:2 Also in time past, when Saul was king over us, thou wast he that leddest out and broughtest in Israel: and the LORD said to thee, Thou shalt feed my people Israel, and thou shalt be a captain over Israel.

5:3 So all the elders of Israel came to the king to Hebron; and king David made a league with them in Hebron before the LORD: and they anointed David king over Israel.

5:4 David was thirty years old when he began to reign, and he reigned forty years.

5:5 In Hebron he reigned over Judah seven years and six months: and in Jerusalem he reigned thirty and three years over all Israel and Judah." (2 Samuel 5:1-5 KJV)

David captured the city from the Jebusites - again here in hindsight recorded as Jerusalem, as it was yet to become Jerusalem.

Araunah the Jebusite

"5:6 And the king and his men went to Jerusalem unto the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land: which spake unto David, saying, Except thou take away the blind and the lame, thou shalt not come in hither: thinking, David cannot come in hither. 5:7 Nevertheless David took the strong hold of Zion: the same is the city of David.

5:8 And David said on that day, Whosoever getteth up to the gutter, and smiteth the Jebusites, and the lame and the blind, that are hated of David's soul, he shall be chief and captain. Wherefore they said, The blind and the lame shall not come into the house.

5:9 So David dwelt in the fort, and called it the city of David. And David built round about from Millo and inward. 5:10 And David went on, and grew great, and the LORD God of hosts was with him.

5:11 And Hiram king of Tyre sent messengers to David, and cedar trees, and carpenters, and masons: and they built David an house. 5:12 And David perceived that the LORD had established him king over Israel, and that he had exalted his kingdom for his people Israel's sake.

5:13 And David took him more concubines and wives out of Jerusalem, after he was come from Hebron: and there were yet sons and daughters born to David. 5:14 And these be the names of those that were born unto him in Jerusalem; Shammua, and Shobab, and Nathan, and Solomon, 5:15 Ibhar also, and Elishua, and Nepheg, and Japhia, 5:16 And Elishama, and Eliada, and Eliphalet." (2 Samuel 5:6-16 KJV)

Despite his having captured the city, David respected the property rights of the Jebusites who remained there peacefully. David purchased the property, that later became the Temple Mount, from its Jebusite owner.

"24:18 And Gad came that day to David, and said unto him, Go up, rear an altar unto the LORD in the threshingfloor of Araunah the Jebusite. 24:19 And David, according to the saying of Gad, went up as the LORD commanded. 24:20 And Araunah looked, and saw the king and his servants coming on toward him: and Araunah went out, and bowed himself before the king on his face upon the ground.

24:21 And Araunah said, Wherefore is my lord the king come to his servant?

And David said, To buy the threshingfloor of thee, to build an altar unto the LORD, that the plague may be stayed from the people.

24:22 And Araunah said unto David, Let my lord the king take and offer up what seemeth good unto him: behold, here be oxen for burnt sacrifice, and threshing instruments and other instruments of the oxen for wood. 24:23 All these things did Araunah, as a king, give unto the king. And Araunah said unto the king, The LORD thy God accept thee.

24:24 And the king said unto Araunah, Nay; but I will surely buy it of thee at a price: neither will I offer burnt offerings unto the LORD my God of that which doth cost me nothing.

So David bought the threshingfloor and the oxen for fifty shekels of silver. 24:25 And David built there an altar unto the LORD, and offered burnt offerings and peace offerings. So the LORD was intreated for the land, and the plague was stayed from Israel." (2 Samuel 24:18-25 KJV)

Fact Finder: For an in-depth historical and prophetic study of Jerusalem, see the study series for A History Of Jerusalem below.

1. In The Beginning
2. Melchizedek's Salem
3. Jebus Of Canaan
4. The City Of David
5. The Glory Of Solomon
6. The Temple Of The LORD
7. The Capital Of Judah
8. Ezra And Nehemiah
9. Greeks, Ptolemies, Seleucids
10. Abomination Of Desolation
11. The Hasmonean Kingdom
12. Pompey And The Caesars
13. The Herodian Dynasty
14. The Coming Of The Messiah
15. Titus And The Zealots
16. Hadrian and Simon bar Kokhba
17. Constantine and Muhammad
18. The British Mandate
19. Zionism
20. War And Peace


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This Day In History, May 13

609: Pope Boniface IV dedicated the pagan Pantheon (which means "all gods") in Rome as a church in honour of the "Blessed Virgin and all martyrs" (see Constantine's Crusades In History And Prophecy and A History Of Jerusalem: Constantine and Muhammad).

1568: Mary, Queen of Scots was defeated by the English at the Battle of Langside in Glasgow.

1607: Captain John Smith and 103 crew in 3 ships landed in what is today Virginia. They named the location "Jamestown" after King James (the same James from which the King James Version of Bible was named) and established what was the first permanent English settlement in the New World wilderness.

1619: Johan van Oldenbarnevelt, statesman and founding father of the Netherlands, was executed by Prince Maurice of Nassau on a charge of subverting religion.

1648: Margaret Jones of Plymouth was found guilty of witchcraft and was sentenced to be hanged.

1779: The War of the Bavarian Succession ended.

1787: Captain Arthur Phillip sailed from Portsmouth, England with eleven ships of convicts (designated as the "First Fleet") to establish a penal colony in Australia.

The First Fleet 1846: The U.S. declared war on Mexico, beginning the "Mexican-American War" (a geographically erroneous term; Mexicans, as well as everyone else in the countries located on the continents of North and South America, are as much "Americans" as people in the United States of America - imagine if, for example, the people of Germany proclaimed themselves to be the Europeans).

1861: Pakistan (which was then a part of British India) opened its first railway line, from Karachi to Kotri.

1861: The Great Comet of 1861 was discovered by John Tebbutt of Windsor, New South Wales, Australia.

1888: Slavery was abolished in Brazil.

1912: The Royal Flying Corps was established in England, the predecessor of the Royal Air Force.

1913: The first 4-engine aircraft was flown in Russia; it was built by Igor Sikorsky.

1917: Near Fatima, Portugal, three shepherd children claimed that Mary, the mother of Jesus, had appeared to them. Since 1930, the alleged incident has come to be known as Our Lady of Fatima (if the children actually did see something, it was a demon, not Mary - who is dead, in her grave, awaiting her resurrection on the day of Christ's return - see What Happens When You Die? and What Does The Bible Really Say About Mary?).

1940: Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands and her daughter Juliana fled the Nazis and sought sanctuary in Britain. Later, in June 1941, Princess Juliana took her children to Canada to escape the bombing, and gave birth to a daughter in Ottawa (the Government of Canada extended diplomatic Embassy status to the hospital room for the moment of the birth, so that the Princess was born in Netherlands territory).

1940: In his first speech as Prime Minister of Britain, Winston Churchill told the House of Commons: "I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat." He went on to become one of the greatest leaders that Britain has known.

1958: French troops took control of Algiers.

1965: Israel and West Germany established diplomatic relations.

1981: Pope John Paul II was shot 4 times (2 bystanders were also wounded) by Turkish gunman Mehmet Ali Agca in St. Peter's Square.

1993: Ezer Weizmann was sworn in as Israel's seventh President. His uncle, Chaim Weizmann, was the first President at the time of modern-day Israel's founding in 1948 (see A History Of Jerusalem: The British Mandate, A History Of Jerusalem: Zionism and A History Of Jerusalem: War And Peace).

1996: Over 400 people were killed and 30,000 injured from a tornado in Bangladesh.

1998: India detonated two nuclear tests at Pokhran, following the three conducted on May 11. The U.S., despite having done the very same sort or tests hundreds of times, imposed economic sanctions on India.





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