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Friday, March 28 2014

1 Samuel 11: Saul The Deliverer

"All the people went to Gilgal; and there they made Saul king before the LORD in Gilgal"

The LORD (Who was and is Jesus Christ - see Genesis 1: In The Beginning Was The Word and The Kingdom Of The LORD God) chose Saul to be Israel's first human king because he was physically impressive, humble and intelligent (see 1 Samuel 9: Saul Of Benjamin and Samuel The Seer and 1 Samuel 10: King Saul of Israel). Saul was not a fool who became a king; he was a king who became a fool.

The era of the Judges (see Israel In History and Prophecy: The Judges and Israel In History and Prophecy: Samuel) ended with the beginning of the Israelite monarchy (see Israel In History and Prophecy: Saul and David). It was nevertheless the task of the first king of Israel to do what the Judges had been given to do - to deliver the people of Israel from the foreign oppression that they had brought upon themselves by their liberal unfaithfulness and corruption. Saul's first challenge as king was to deliver Israel from the Ammonites - who demanded that Israel not only serve the invaders, but "thrust out all your right eyes."

Saul Prophesies

"11:1 Then Nahash the Ammonite came up, and encamped against Jabeshgilead: and all the men of Jabesh said unto Nahash, Make a covenant with us, and we will serve thee.

11:2 And Nahash the Ammonite answered them, On this condition will I make a covenant with you, that I may thrust out all your right eyes, and lay it for a reproach upon all Israel.

11:3 And the elders of Jabesh said unto him, Give us seven days' respite, that we may send messengers unto all the coasts of Israel: and then, if there be no man to save us, we will come out to thee." (1 Samuel 11:1-3 KJV)

When Saul heard of the demand, "the Spirit of God came upon Saul when he heard those tidings, and his anger was kindled greatly." The next day, he delivered a decisive defeat upon the Ammonites.

"11:4 Then came the messengers to Gibeah of Saul, and told the tidings in the ears of the people: and all the people lifted up their voices, and wept. 11:5 And, behold, Saul came after the herd out of the field; and Saul said, What aileth the people that they weep? And they told him the tidings of the men of Jabesh.

11:6 And the Spirit of God came upon Saul when he heard those tidings, and his anger was kindled greatly. 11:7 And he took a yoke of oxen, and hewed them in pieces, and sent them throughout all the coasts of Israel by the hands of messengers, saying, Whosoever cometh not forth after Saul and after Samuel, so shall it be done unto his oxen. And the fear of the LORD fell on the people, and they came out with one consent. 11:8 And when he numbered them in Bezek, the children of Israel were three hundred thousand, and the men of Judah thirty thousand.

11:9 And they said unto the messengers that came, Thus shall ye say unto the men of Jabeshgilead, To morrow, by that time the sun be hot, ye shall have help. And the messengers came and shewed it to the men of Jabesh; and they were glad. 11:10 Therefore the men of Jabesh said, To morrow we will come out unto you, and ye shall do with us all that seemeth good unto you.

11:11 And it was so on the morrow, that Saul put the people in three companies; and they came into the midst of the host in the morning watch, and slew the Ammonites until the heat of the day: and it came to pass, that they which remained were scattered, so that two of them were not left together." (1 Samuel 11:4-11 KJV)

Although the actual demand for a king by the Israelites was for someone to fight their battles for them (see 1 Samuel 8: Our King May Judge Us), the incident caused them to return to Samuel - who they had rejected. Samuel brought them to their senses with the proclamation "the LORD hath wrought salvation in Israel." Saul was then formally accepted as the king that they demanded.

"11:12 And the people said unto Samuel, Who is he that said, Shall Saul reign over us? bring the men, that we may put them to death.

11:13 And Saul said, There shall not a man be put to death this day: for to day the LORD hath wrought salvation in Israel.

11:14 Then said Samuel to the people, Come, and let us go to Gilgal, and renew the kingdom there. 11:15 And all the people went to Gilgal; and there they made Saul king before the LORD in Gilgal; and there they sacrificed sacrifices of peace offerings before the LORD; and there Saul and all the men of Israel rejoiced greatly." (1 Samuel 11:12-15 KJV)

Fact Finder: How did the Ammonites originate? How were they related to Abraham?
See Genesis 19: Fire And Brimstone Upon Sodom And Gomorrah; see also Why Did Lot's Wife Look Back?


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This Day In History, March 28

37: Roman Emperor Caligula accepted the title of the Principate by the Senate (see The Politics Of Rome and A History Of Jerusalem: Pompey And The Caesars).

193: The accession of Didius Julianus, 20th Roman emperor (see also Pax Romana: The Birth Of The Roman Empire).

845: Paris was sacked by Viking raiders.

Nuclear Bomb 1800: The Act of Union with England was passed by the Irish Parliament.

1849: Frederick William IV of Prussia was elected Emperor of the Germans by the German National Assembly (see Emperors and Popes).

1854: Britain and France declared war on Russia in the Crimean War.

1917: Jews were expelled from Tel Aviv and Jaffa by Ottoman/Turkish authorities (see A History Of Jerusalem: The British Mandate).

1930: Constantinople (which was named after the Roman emperor Constantine; listen to our Sermon Constantine's Papacy and see A History Of Jerusalem: Constantine and Muhammad) and Angora changed their names to Istanbul and Ankara, Turkey.

1933: The Reichstag (the German Parliament) gave dictatorial powers to Adolf Hitler (see Presidential Quotes On War, Terrorism, Religion). That same day, the Nazis banned Jews in all businesses, professions and schools in Germany.

1939: The Spanish Civil War ended when Madrid fell to Francisco Franco.

1945: Germany launched the last of the V-2 rockets against Britain.

1968: The U.S. lost its first warplane in Vietnam when an F-111 vanished on a combat mission over North Vietnam. According to most reliable estimates, by the end of the war, all branches of the U.S. military had over 2,000 fighter aircraft and 7,000 helicopters lost in Vietnam. The U.S. involvement in the Vietnam civil war was very profitable for a few manufacturers of weapons and machines of war - as warned in 1961 by retiring President Dwight Eisenhower who stated that the "military-industrial complex" would get the U.S. into endless and needless wars for the business of war - until the war profiteers ("the disastrous rise of misplaced power") would eventually "bleed" the U.S. dry.

"Our military organization today bears little relation to that known by any of my predecessors in peacetime, or indeed by the fighting men of World War II or Korea.

Until the latest of our world conflicts, the United States had no armaments industry. American makers of plowshares could, with time and as required, make swords as well. But now we can no longer risk emergency improvisation of national defense; we have been compelled to create a permanent armaments industry of vast proportions. Added to this, three and a half million men and women are directly engaged in the defense establishment. We annually spend on military security more than the net income of all United States corporations.

This conjunction of an immense military establishment and a large arms industry is new in the American experience. The total influence -- economic, political, even spiritual -- is felt in every city, every State house, every office of the Federal government. We recognize the imperative need for this development. Yet we must not fail to comprehend its grave implications. Our toil, resources and livelihood are all involved; so is the very structure of our society.

In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist."

1979: Equipment failures and human error led to a partial core meltdown at the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor in Middleton, Pennsylvania.

2003: In one of numerous "friendly fire" incidents during the Iraq and Afghanistan invasions, two U.S. A-10 Thunderbolts attacked British tanks in Iraq.

2005: A magnitude 8.7 earthquake struck Sumatra.


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