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Friday, April 4 2014

1 Samuel 18: The Rise Of David

"David went out whithersoever Saul sent him, and behaved himself wisely: and Saul set him over the men of war, and he was accepted in the sight of all the people"

Jonathan, the son and would-have-been successor of King Saul (see 1 Samuel 10: King Saul of Israel), was a wise and fearsome warrior (see 1 Samuel 14: Jonathan's Sweet Victory). He was nevertheless impressed by the young shepherd youth's defeat of the giant Philistine Goliath (see 1 Samuel 17: The Battle Of David And Goliath). The actual Biblical account also reveals that Jonathan and David were not the same age, as is often portrayed. When they met, Jonathan, although a young man, was already a battle commander, while David was too young to be in the army. Nevertheless, the famous friendship of David and Jonathan began on the day that David defeated Goliath.

David and Saul

"18:1 And it came to pass, when he had made an end of speaking unto Saul, that the soul of Jonathan was knit with the soul of David, and Jonathan loved him as his own soul [see also What Does The Bible Really Say About Your Soul?]. 18:2 And Saul took him that day, and would let him go no more home to his father's house. 18:3 Then Jonathan and David made a covenant, because he loved him as his own soul. 18:4 And Jonathan stripped himself of the robe that was upon him, and gave it to David, and his garments, even to his sword, and to his bow, and to his girdle." (1 Samuel 18:1-4 KJV)

The entry age for the ancient Israelite army was 20 years ("1:3 From twenty years old and upward, all that are able to go forth to war in Israel: thou and Aaron shall number them by their armies." Numbers 1:3 KJV; see also Numbers 1: The First Sinai Census). David had not only reached that age after taking up residence with Saul, but quickly proved himself to be a consistently-winning young officer.

"18:5 And David went out whithersoever Saul sent him, and behaved himself wisely: and Saul set him over the men of war, and he was accepted in the sight of all the people, and also in the sight of Saul's servants." (1 Samuel 18:5 KJV)

As has happened throughout history (and just as much in the present day), in the military, in politics, in science, in education, in practically anything, those who become too successful begin to be viewed as a threat to the position of their master. Saul, at first, was merely jealous of David for the victories that David had delivered to Saul - victories that Saul was unable to deliver to himself. David's victory over Goliath, while the "leader" Saul remained safely back with those who were "following" him, became an ongoing irksome song for the king.

"18:6 And it came to pass as they came, when David was returned from the slaughter of the Philistine, that the women came out of all cities of Israel, singing and dancing, to meet king Saul, with tabrets, with joy, and with instruments of musick. 18:7 And the women answered one another as they played, and said, Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands.

18:8 And Saul was very wroth, and the saying displeased him; and he said, They have ascribed unto David ten thousands, and to me they have ascribed but thousands: and what can he have more but the kingdom? 18:9 And Saul eyed David from that day and forward.

18:10 And it came to pass on the morrow, that the evil spirit from God came upon Saul, and he prophesied in the midst of the house: and David played with his hand, as at other times: and there was a javelin in Saul's hand. 18:11 And Saul cast the javelin; for he said, I will smite David even to the wall with it. And David avoided out of his presence twice." (1 Samuel 18:6-11 KJV)

The jealousy then became fear: "Saul was afraid of David, because the LORD was with him, and was departed from Saul" (see 1 Samuel 15: Saul's Impeachment). Saul then devised a scheme to get David killed in battle. The "bait" was Saul's daughter, Merab. The plan failed, but Saul gained himself a son-in-law.

"18:12 And Saul was afraid of David, because the LORD was with him, and was departed from Saul. 18:13 Therefore Saul removed him from him, and made him his captain over a thousand; and he went out and came in before the people. 18:14 And David behaved himself wisely in all his ways; and the LORD was with him. 18:15 Wherefore when Saul saw that he behaved himself very wisely, he was afraid of him. 18:16 But all Israel and Judah loved David, because he went out and came in before them.

18:17 And Saul said to David, Behold my elder daughter Merab, her will I give thee to wife: only be thou valiant for me, and fight the LORD'S battles. For Saul said, Let not mine hand be upon him, but let the hand of the Philistines be upon him.

Wives Of King David 18:18 And David said unto Saul, Who am I? and what is my life, or my father's family in Israel, that I should be son in law to the king? 18:19 But it came to pass at the time when Merab Saul's daughter should have been given to David, that she was given unto Adriel the Meholathite to wife.

18:20 And Michal Saul's daughter loved David: and they told Saul, and the thing pleased him. 18:21 And Saul said, I will give him her, that she may be a snare to him, and that the hand of the Philistines may be against him. Wherefore Saul said to David, Thou shalt this day be my son in law in the one of the twain.

18:22 And Saul commanded his servants, saying, Commune with David secretly, and say, Behold, the king hath delight in thee, and all his servants love thee: now therefore be the king's son in law.

18:23 And Saul's servants spake those words in the ears of David. And David said, Seemeth it to you a light thing to be a king's son in law, seeing that I am a poor man, and lightly esteemed?

18:24 And the servants of Saul told him, saying, On this manner spake David. 18:25 And Saul said, Thus shall ye say to David, The king desireth not any dowry, but an hundred foreskins of the Philistines, to be avenged of the king's enemies. But Saul thought to make David fall by the hand of the Philistines.

18:26 And when his servants told David these words, it pleased David well to be the king's son in law: and the days were not expired. 18:27 Wherefore David arose and went, he and his men, and slew of the Philistines two hundred men; and David brought their foreskins, and they gave them in full tale to the king, that he might be the king's son in law. And Saul gave him Michal his daughter to wife." (1 Samuel 18:12-27 KJV)

David was not being aggressive toward Saul. He was a humble and loyal servant of King Saul. Nevertheless, increasingly unstable Saul "saw and knew that the LORD was with David, and that Michal Saul's daughter loved him. And Saul was yet the more afraid of David; and Saul became David's enemy continually."

"18:28 And Saul saw and knew that the LORD was with David, and that Michal Saul's daughter loved him. 18:29 And Saul was yet the more afraid of David; and Saul became David's enemy continually.

18:30 Then the princes of the Philistines went forth: and it came to pass, after they went forth, that David behaved himself more wisely than all the servants of Saul; so that his name was much set by." (1 Samuel 18:28-30 KJV)

Fact Finder: Did David eventually marry two of Saul's daughters?
See The Wives Of King David and Merab and Michal


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This Day In History, April 4

527: In Constantinople (named after Emperor Constantine; see Constantine's Crusades In History And Prophecy), a gravely ill Justin crowned his nephew Justinian as co-emperor.

1147: The first historical record of Moscow (see also Gog and Magog).

Francis Drake 1284: Alfonso X, king of Castile and Leon, died at age 63. His reign was dominated by a costly and unpopular attempt to become German king, and thereby the Holy Roman emperor (the official title of which was "the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation"; see The Holy Roman Empire Of The German Nation). Although he was actually elected German king in 1257, the Pope refused to accept the election, and Alfonso spent years fruitlessly pursuing the matter (see Emperors and Popes).

1460: The University of Basle in Switzerland was established.

1507: Future Protestant reformer Martin Luther, age 21, was ordained a priest in the Roman Catholic Church. Although Luther later rejected the leadership of the Papacy (because of the immoral behavior of the pope at the time), he nevertheless kept practically all of the Church of Rome's antichrist doctrines, as do most of the "Protestant" churches to this day (e.g. see Why Observe The True Sabbath?).

1541: Ignatius of Loyola became the first superior-general of the Jesuits.

1581: English explorer and naval commander Frances Drake and his crew completed their circumnavigation of the world.

1687: James II ordered his Declaration of Indulgence read in church, allowing for full liberty of worship in England. It allowed peaceable meetings of nonconformists and forgave all penalties for ecclesiastical offenses.

1721: Sir Robert Walpole became the first Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, under King George I.

1812: In his belligerent provocations that led to his declaring the start of the War of 1812-1814 (in which his publicly-stated goal was to obliterate Canada as a nation and annex the Canadian people and territory into the U.S. by conquest), U.S. President James Madison enacted a ninety-day embargo on trade with Britain.

1905: An earthquake in Kangra India, killed 375,000 people.

1918: During the First World War, the Battle of The Somme ended (listen to our Sermon The European World Wars).

1939: Faisal II became King of Iraq.

1944: During the Second World War, British troops captured Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

1949: 12 nations - the United States, Canada, Britain, France, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Denmark, Norway, Iceland and Portugal - founded the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). West Germany, Greece, Turkey and Spain joined later.

1968: Martin Luther King was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee, at age 39.

1975: Microsoft was founded by Bill Gates and Paul Allen in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

1973: The World Trade Center in New York was officially dedicated.

1975: A U.S. Air Force C-5A Galaxy, transporting orphans out of the war zone that the U.S. created, crashed near Saigon, South Vietnam shortly after takeoff; 172 of the children died.

1983 The first launch of the space shuttle Challenger. It was in service for less than 3 years before exploding on January 28 1986 while attempting its tenth launch.

1984: U.S. President Ronald Reagan called for an international ban on chemical weapons (while declaring the U.S. exempt of any ban for reasons of "national security").

2002: The government of Angola signed an agreement with rebels to end the Angolan Civil War.





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