. Make a Donation

Index Page
Contact
About The Author
Sermons
Bible Quiz
Holy Day Calendar
Free Online Bibles
Bible Reading Plan

Question? Quick Search the thousands of Bible studies on this website.
Just type in topic word(s) or a question.

Wednesday, April 30 2014

2 Samuel 11: Bathsheba, The Wife Of Uriah

"Is not this Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite?"

King David's latest war with the Ammonites began when the Ammonites abused David's peaceful ambassadors (see 2 Samuel 10: The Ambassadors Incident).

David and Bathsheba

"11:1 And it came to pass, after the year was expired, at the time when kings go forth to battle, that David sent Joab, and his servants with him, and all Israel; and they destroyed the children of Ammon, and besieged Rabbah. But David tarried still at Jerusalem." (2 Samuel 11:1 KJV)

One night during that time of war, David, while on his palace terrace, witnessed a woman bathing in a nearby pool. It resulted in the infamous incident of adultery that became the worst event of David's life.

The act was consensual. Both were equally guilty, regardless of how it came about (some debate which of them was the actual mischief-maker, suggesting that the lonely Bathsheba, whose military-serving husband was away for some time in the war with the Ammonites, knew that she would be observed from the king's nearby palace). Both were married; Bathsheba to Uriah, and David already to more than one wife (see the Fact Finder question below).

"11:2 And it came to pass in an eveningtide, that David arose from off his bed, and walked upon the roof of the king's house: and from the roof he saw a woman washing herself; and the woman was very beautiful to look upon. 11:3 And David sent and enquired after the woman.

And one said, Is not this Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite?

11:4 And David sent messengers, and took her; and she came in unto him, and he lay with her; for she was purified from her uncleanness: and she returned unto her house. 11:5 And the woman conceived, and sent and told David, and said, I am with child." (2 Samuel 11:2-5 KJV)

David then made a clumsy attempt to cover up the adulterous pregnancy. Even if the superficial facade had worked, an obviously full-term infant born only about six months after the only time in which the woman's husband could have been the father of her child would have caused many questions and suspicions.

"11:6 And David sent to Joab, saying, Send me Uriah the Hittite. And Joab sent Uriah to David. 11:7 And when Uriah was come unto him, David demanded of him how Joab did, and how the people did, and how the war prospered. 11:8 And David said to Uriah, Go down to thy house, and wash thy feet. And Uriah departed out of the king's house, and there followed him a mess of meat from the king. 11:9 But Uriah slept at the door of the king's house with all the servants of his lord, and went not down to his house.

11:10 And when they had told David, saying, Uriah went not down unto his house, David said unto Uriah, Camest thou not from thy journey? why then didst thou not go down unto thine house?

11:11 And Uriah said unto David, The ark, and Israel, and Judah, abide in tents; and my lord Joab, and the servants of my lord, are encamped in the open fields; shall I then go into mine house, to eat and to drink, and to lie with my wife? as thou livest, and as thy soul liveth, I will not do this thing.

11:12 And David said to Uriah, Tarry here to day also, and to morrow I will let thee depart. So Uriah abode in Jerusalem that day, and the morrow. 11:13 And when David had called him, he did eat and drink before him; and he made him drunk: and at even he went out to lie on his bed with the servants of his lord, but went not down to his house." (2 Samuel 11:6-13 KJV)

When David's attempts to get Uriah to return home failed, in order to attempt to cover up their violation of the Seventh Commandment (against adultery), David violated the Sixth Commandment (against murder) - David arranged to have Uriah killed in battle.

Bathsheba

"11:14 And it came to pass in the morning, that David wrote a letter to Joab, and sent it by the hand of Uriah. 11:15 And he wrote in the letter, saying, Set ye Uriah in the forefront of the hottest battle, and retire ye from him, that he may be smitten, and die.

11:16 And it came to pass, when Joab observed the city, that he assigned Uriah unto a place where he knew that valiant men were. 11:17 And the men of the city went out, and fought with Joab: and there fell some of the people of the servants of David; and Uriah the Hittite died also.

11:18 Then Joab sent and told David all the things concerning the war; 11:19 And charged the messenger, saying, When thou hast made an end of telling the matters of the war unto the king, 11:20 And if so be that the king's wrath arise, and he say unto thee, Wherefore approached ye so nigh unto the city when ye did fight? knew ye not that they would shoot from the wall? 11:21 Who smote Abimelech the son of Jerubbesheth? did not a woman cast a piece of a millstone upon him from the wall, that he died in Thebez? why went ye nigh the wall? then say thou, Thy servant Uriah the Hittite is dead also.

11:22 So the messenger went, and came and shewed David all that Joab had sent him for. 11:23 And the messenger said unto David, Surely the men prevailed against us, and came out unto us into the field, and we were upon them even unto the entering of the gate. 11:24 And the shooters shot from off the wall upon thy servants; and some of the king's servants be dead, and thy servant Uriah the Hittite is dead also.

11:25 Then David said unto the messenger, Thus shalt thou say unto Joab, Let not this thing displease thee, for the sword devoureth one as well as another: make thy battle more strong against the city, and overthrow it: and encourage thou him." (2 Samuel 11:14-25 KJV)

After the death of Uriah, Bathsheba "mourned for her husband" but then quickly married David in order to give the questionable appearance that David was the father of her child (again, keeping in mind that a full-term infant would have seemingly been born, by then, only five or six months after the marriage), which he was anyway. If humans knew about it (Joab very likely did - see the verses above), none were saying, but the whole matter was in full sight of the LORD: "But the thing that David had done displeased the LORD."

"11:26 And when the wife of Uriah heard that Uriah her husband was dead, she mourned for her husband. 11:27 And when the mourning was past, David sent and fetched her to his house, and she became his wife, and bare him a son. But the thing that David had done displeased the LORD." (2 Samuel 11:26-27 KJV)

Fact Finder: How many wives did King David have?
See The Wives Of King David


Book

Book

Book

Bible Quiz Daily Bible Study Library
Thousands of Studies!

Jesus Christ
Bible History
Prophecy
Christian Living
Encouragement
Eternal Life
By The Book
Bible Places
Curiosities
The Spirit World
Book

Book

Book


This Day In History, April 30

311: Galerius Valerius Maximianus issued an edict which allowed (the Roman version of) Christianity in the Roman Empire (see A History Of Jerusalem: Constantine and Muhammad and Constantine's Crusades In History And Prophecy).

313: Licinius unified the whole of the eastern Roman empire under his own rule after the Battle of Tzirallum.

1006: The brightest supernova in recorded history was observed.

1156: Moscow was founded.

1303: When German king Albrecht (Albert) obtained confirmation of his election from Pope Boniface VIII, he swore an oath of obedience to the papacy, and promised that none of his sons would be elected German king without papal consent (see Emperors and Popes).

1492: The Papacy and the Roman Catholic king and queen of Spain, Ferdinand and Isabella, granted the Italian sailor Christopher Columbus (actual name in Italian: Cristoforo Colombo) his commission of exploration to the "New World." As shown on the map, the four voyages of Columbus were actually limited to the area of the islands in the Caribbean, not to what is today called "America" (see also Thanksgiving In History and Prophecy).

Voyages of Christopher Columbus 1513: Edmund de la Pole, the Yorkist pretender to the throne of England, was executed on the orders of King Henry VIII.

1527: Henry VIII and King Francis of France signed the Treaty of Westminster.

1563: Jews were expelled from France by order of King Charles VI.

1725: Spain withdrew from the Quadruple Alliance.

1803: The treaty was signed for the Louisiana Purchase. France, under Napoleon, found itself requiring the funds for Napoleon's European wars of conquest (when Britain was at war with the U.S. during the War of 1812-14, Britain was also at war to stop Napoleon in Europe; to Britain, the War of 1812 was a relative "side show" from the great war in Europe against Napoleon at the same time).

1804: Shrapnel, named after British soldier Henry Shrapnel, was used for the first time in warfare by the British against the Dutch in Suriname.

1849: Giuseppe Garibaldi, Italian patriot and guerrilla leader, repulsed a French attack on Rome.

1902: In Vienna, Theodore Herzl completed his novel Altneuland.

1917: German submarines in the First World War, total ships sunk for month: 335

1943: The British submarine HMS Seraph dropped the "man who never was," a dead man planted with false invasion papers, off the coast of Spain. It turned out to be one of the greatest deceptions in military history.

1945: Adolf Hitler, 56, and his wife of 1 day, Eva Braun, 33, committed suicide in their underground "Fuhrerbunker" in Berlin as Russian troops penetrated central Berlin.

1966: The "Church of Satan" was established at the Black House in San Francisco, California.

1975: In South Vietnam, with the last of the U.S. military forces and diplomatic (i.e. CIA and mercenary "contractors") personnel having evacuated the previous day, President Minh announced an unconditional surrender to the Vietcong, ending the 20th Century's longest civil war. Vietnam became a single country again, after having been divided by imperial France earlier in the 20th century - which triggered the civil war that the U.S. involved itself in later, in the 1960s.

1980: Terrorists seized the Iranian Embassy in London.

1980: Queen Juliana of the Netherlands signed the Act of Abdication, ending 31 years as monarch. She was succeeded by Queen Beatrix.

1991: A cyclone (hurricane) killed 125,000 people in Bangladesh.

2004: Photographs of U.S. soldiers abusing and sexually humiliating live and dead Iraqi prisoners at the Abu Ghraib prison in Baghdad (where Saddam Hussein's thugs tortured and abused prisoners in the same way before Iraq was "liberated") were leaked to the public.

2009: The Chrysler automobile company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

2009: Seven people were killed and 17 others injured at a Queen's Day parade in Apeldoorn, Netherlands during an attempted assassination of Queen Beatrix.


.


.

.


.


editionDBSx201702et

Copyright © Wayne Blank