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Friday, July 11 2014

1 Chronicles 11: When Did Jerusalem Become An Israelite City?

"David dwelt in the castle; therefore they called it the city of David"

Jerusalem was not the capital of Israel, or even an Israelite city at all, until after the civil war between the houses of King Saul and David (see Saul's Impeachment, Why Didn't David Kill Saul? and The War Between The Houses of David and Saul). Saul's capital was in Samaria, north of Jerusalem, while David's capital was in Hebron, south of Jerusalem (see King David Of Judah).

David

"11:1 Then all Israel gathered themselves to David unto Hebron, saying, Behold, we are thy bone and thy flesh. 11:2 And moreover in time past, even when Saul was king, thou wast he that leddest out and broughtest in Israel: and the LORD thy God said unto thee, Thou shalt feed my people Israel, and thou shalt be ruler over my people Israel.

11:3 Therefore came all the elders of Israel to the king to Hebron; and David made a covenant with them in Hebron before the LORD; and they anointed David king over Israel, according to the word of the LORD by Samuel." (1 Chronicles 11:11-3 KJV)

The Jebusites had occupied the city, which in their time was known as "Jebus," or "the Jebusite city," for centuries (but not from the beginning; see How Long Was Jerusalem The Capital Of Israel? and the Fact Finder question below). "And the inhabitants of Jebus said to David, Thou shalt not come hither. Nevertheless David took the castle of Zion, which is the city of David."

"11:4 And David and all Israel went to Jerusalem, which is Jebus; where the Jebusites were, the inhabitants of the land. 11:5 And the inhabitants of Jebus said to David, Thou shalt not come hither. Nevertheless David took the castle of Zion, which is the city of David.

11:6 And David said, Whosoever smiteth the Jebusites first shall be chief and captain. So Joab the son of Zeruiah went first up, and was chief.

11:7 And David dwelt in the castle; therefore they called it the city of David. 11:8 And he built the city round about, even from Millo round about: and Joab repaired the rest of the city. 11:9 So David waxed greater and greater: for the LORD of hosts was with him." (1 Chronicles 11:4-9 KJV)

The kingdom of David was then established at the end of the civil war, when David had a battle-hardened army at his command. It was that military power that soon transformed the Kingdom of Israel into an empire that lasted until the end of the reign of David's son and royal successor, Solomon (see King David's Empire).

"11:10 These also are the chief of the mighty men whom David had, who strengthened themselves with him in his kingdom, and with all Israel, to make him king, according to the word of the LORD concerning Israel.

Ancient Jerusalem 11:11 And this is the number of the mighty men whom David had; Jashobeam, an Hachmonite, the chief of the captains: he lifted up his spear against three hundred slain by him at one time.

11:12 And after him was Eleazar the son of Dodo, the Ahohite, who was one of the three mighties. 11:13 He was with David at Pasdammim, and there the Philistines were gathered together to battle, where was a parcel of ground full of barley; and the people fled from before the Philistines. 11:14 And they set themselves in the midst of that parcel, and delivered it, and slew the Philistines; and the LORD saved them by a great deliverance.

11:15 Now three of the thirty captains went down to the rock to David, into the cave of Adullam; and the host of the Philistines encamped in the valley of Rephaim. 11:16 And David was then in the hold, and the Philistines' garrison was then at Bethlehem. 11:17 And David longed, and said, Oh that one would give me drink of the water of the well of Bethlehem, that is at the gate! 11:18 And the three brake through the host of the Philistines, and drew water out of the well of Bethlehem, that was by the gate, and took it, and brought it to David: but David would not drink of it, but poured it out to the LORD, 11:19 And said, My God forbid it me, that I should do this thing: shall I drink the blood of these men that have put their lives in jeopardy? for with the jeopardy of their lives they brought it. Therefore he would not drink it. These things did these three mightiest.

11:20 And Abishai the brother of Joab, he was chief of the three: for lifting up his spear against three hundred, he slew them, and had a name among the three. 11:21 Of the three, he was more honourable than the two; for he was their captain: howbeit he attained not to the first three.

11:22 Benaiah the son of Jehoiada, the son of a valiant man of Kabzeel, who had done many acts; he slew two lionlike men of Moab: also he went down and slew a lion in a pit in a snowy day. 11:23 And he slew an Egyptian, a man of great stature, five cubits high; and in the Egyptian's hand was a spear like a weaver's beam; and he went down to him with a staff, and plucked the spear out of the Egyptian's hand, and slew him with his own spear. 11:24 These things did Benaiah the son of Jehoiada, and had the name among the three mighties. 11:25 Behold, he was honourable among the thirty, but attained not to the first three: and David set him over his guard.

11:26 Also the valiant men of the armies were, Asahel the brother of Joab, Elhanan the son of Dodo of Bethlehem, 11:27 Shammoth the Harorite, Helez the Pelonite, 11:28 Ira the son of Ikkesh the Tekoite, Abiezer the Antothite, 11:29 Sibbecai the Hushathite, Ilai the Ahohite, 11:30 Maharai the Netophathite, Heled the son of Baanah the Netophathite, 11:31 Ithai the son of Ribai of Gibeah, that pertained to the children of Benjamin, Benaiah the Pirathonite, 11:32 Hurai of the brooks of Gaash, Abiel the Arbathite, 11:33 Azmaveth the Baharumite, Eliahba the Shaalbonite, 11:34 The sons of Hashem the Gizonite, Jonathan the son of Shage the Hararite, 11:35 Ahiam the son of Sacar the Hararite, Eliphal the son of Ur, 11:36 Hepher the Mecherathite, Ahijah the Pelonite, 11:37 Hezro the Carmelite, Naarai the son of Ezbai, 11:38 Joel the brother of Nathan, Mibhar the son of Haggeri, 11:39 Zelek the Ammonite, Naharai the Berothite, the armourbearer of Joab the son of Zeruiah, 11:40 Ira the Ithrite, Gareb the Ithrite, 11:41 Uriah the Hittite, Zabad the son of Ahlai, 11:42 Adina the son of Shiza the Reubenite, a captain of the Reubenites, and thirty with him, 11:43 Hanan the son of Maachah, and Joshaphat the Mithnite, 11:44 Uzzia the Ashterathite, Shama and Jehiel the sons of Hothan the Aroerite, 11:45 Jediael the son of Shimri, and Joha his brother, the Tizite, 11:46 Eliel the Mahavite, and Jeribai, and Joshaviah, the sons of Elnaam, and Ithmah the Moabite, 11:47 Eliel, and Obed, and Jasiel the Mesobaite." (1 Chronicles 11:10-47 KJV)

Fact Finder: When did the LORD (Who was and is Jesus Christ - see Genesis 1: In The Beginning Was The Word and The Kingdom Of The LORD God) make Jerusalem His capital from which He will rule the world in the Kingdom of God?
See the complete series of 20 studies for Jerusalem (the links to all are in each one), beginning with A History Of Jerusalem: In The Beginning


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This Day In History, July 11

472: Western Roman Emperor Anthemius was captured and executed in Rome by his own generals (see A History Of Jerusalem: Pompey And The Caesars; also Whatever Happened To Those Romans?).

911: The Treaty of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte was signed between Charles "the Simple" and Rollo of Normandy.

1302: The Battle of the Golden Spurs (Dutch Guldensporenslag); the Flemish (Flanders is the southern area of the Netherlands that 5 centuries later became the Dutch-speaking northern area of Belgium) defeated the king of France's royal army.

Martin Frobisher 1346: Charles IV of Luxembourg was elected Holy Roman Emperor in Germany (see The Holy Roman Empire).

1533: Pope Clement VII threatened English King Henry VIII with ex-communication if he did not resume his marriage to Catherine of Aragon. Henry wasn't impressed with the threat - the marriage was annulled by Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Cranmer, and afterward Henry married Anne Boleyn. Two years later, Henry broke with Rome and established the Church of England as the national religion of England (while at the same, as with the rest of the "Protestant" world, they maintained nearly all of Rome's antichrist doctrines; see Antichristians and Is Your Religion Your Religion?).

1576: English explorer Martin Frobisher sighted Greenland.

1613: The first Romanov Czar, Michael, was crowned in Russia ("Czar" is the Russian form of "Caesar," as is the German "Kaiser"). The dynasty lasted until the Russian Revolution in 1917 when the reigning Czar at that time, Nicholas II, and his entire family, were executed by the communist revolutionaries.

1616: Samuel de Champlain returned to Quebec.

1708: Forces under England's Duke of Marlborough defeated the French under Louis Vendome at the Battle of Oudenarde during the War of Spanish Succession.

1740: Jews were expelled from Little Russia by order of Czarina Anne.

1750: Halifax, Nova Scotia was destroyed by fire.

1776: English explorer Captain James Cook set sail on his third voyage.

1804: Aaron Burr, a former Vice President of the U.S. killed former Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton in a duel over political rivalry and accusations.

1882: During the Anglo-Egyptian War, the British Mediterranean Fleet began the bombardment of Alexandria, Egypt (see also A History Of Jerusalem: The British Mandate).

1889: Tijuana, Mexico, was founded.

1906: Sunday became the official day of rest in Canada; the Senate passed the so-called "Lord's Day Act" which was approved by the House of Commons by Sir Wilfred Laurier's government and was supported by Protestant and Roman Catholic churches and labour groups. The act restricted business, prohibited entertainment, sport, and almost all commerce on Sunday. The law remained in force until the Supreme Court of Canada struck it down in 1985 because it was judged to infringe upon the religious rights of non-Christians - an ironic view because the Sunday law in fact infringed upon the religious rights of true Christians. The Government had the right idea, but the wrong day; Sunday has never been, nor will ever be, the true Christian Sabbath (see When Is The LORD's Day? and Why Observe The True Sabbath?).

1919: The eight-hour working day and "free Sunday" become law in the Netherlands (again, as explained above, the right idea, but the wrong day).

1942: The longest bombing raid of the Second World War was carried out by 1,750 British and Canadian Lancaster bombers (listen to our Sermon The European World Wars).

1962: The first transatlantic satellite television transmission.

1979: After orbiting the earth since 1973, the U.S. Skylab re-entered the Earth's atmosphere and disintegrated over the Indian Ocean.

1995: Full diplomatic relations were established between the U.S. and Vietnam.

1995: More than 8,000 men and children in Bosnia were murdered by Serbian troops commanded by Ratko Mladic.

2006: Over 200 people were murdered in a series of terrorist attacks in Mumbai, India.


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