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Thursday, August 14 2014

2 Chronicles 16: Asa's Physicians

"He sought not to the LORD, but to the physicians"

When the LORD (Who was and is Jesus Christ - see Genesis 1: In The Beginning Was The Word and The Kingdom Of The LORD God) divided the united kingdom of Israel into "Israel" and "Judah" (see Israel In History and Prophecy: Israel and Judah), they became two independent kingdoms who thereafter were sometimes allied, while other times at war (see also Old Boys Versus Greenhorns). In the time of King Asa of Judah, "Baasha king of Israel came up against Judah, and built Ramah, to the intent that he might let none go out or come in to Asa king of Judah."

"16:1 In the six and thirtieth year of the reign of Asa Baasha king of Israel came up against Judah, and built Ramah, to the intent that he might let none go out or come in to Asa king of Judah." (2 Chronicles 16:1 KJV)

Asa had been a righteous and faithful king (see The History Of Idolatry). He had already known and experienced that the LORD will defend those who are right (see When The LORD Leads The Army). In his later years however, Asa, like many others, had become spiritually nearsighted (i.e. self-sighted) in his view of the world. He sought to buy "friends" (i.e. political and military harlots), which was foolish, but moreover he used "silver and gold out of the treasures of the house of the LORD and of the king's house" to rent their "love."

Judea

"16:2 Then Asa brought out silver and gold out of the treasures of the house of the LORD and of the king's house, and sent to Benhadad king of Syria, that dwelt at Damascus, saying, 16:3 There is a league between me and thee, as there was between my father and thy father: behold, I have sent thee silver and gold; go, break thy league with Baasha king of Israel, that he may depart from me." (2 Chronicles 16:2-3 KJV)

Benhadad accepted the mercenary contract with Judah. He "sent the captains of his armies against the cities of Israel."

"16:4 And Benhadad hearkened unto king Asa, and sent the captains of his armies against the cities of Israel; and they smote Ijon, and Dan, and Abelmaim, and all the store cities of Naphtali. 16:5 And it came to pass, when Baasha heard it, that he left off building of Ramah, and let his work cease. 16:6 Then Asa the king took all Judah; and they carried away the stones of Ramah, and the timber thereof, wherewith Baasha was building; and he built therewith Geba and Mizpah." (2 Chronicles 16:4-6 KJV)

When Hanani, a prophet of the LORD, confronted Asa (see also Who Has A Spirit Of Confrontation?) with "Herein thou hast done foolishly: therefore from henceforth thou shalt have wars," he "was wroth with the seer, and put him in a prison house; for he was in a rage with him because of this thing." Asa was becoming a fool, and a tyrant: "Asa oppressed some of the people the same time."

"16:7 And at that time Hanani the seer came to Asa king of Judah, and said unto him, Because thou hast relied on the king of Syria, and not relied on the LORD thy God, therefore is the host of the king of Syria escaped out of thine hand. 16:8 Were not the Ethiopians and the Lubims a huge host, with very many chariots and horsemen? yet, because thou didst rely on the LORD, he delivered them into thine hand. 16:9 For the eyes of the LORD run to and fro throughout the whole earth, to shew himself strong in the behalf of them whose heart is perfect toward him. Herein thou hast done foolishly: therefore from henceforth thou shalt have wars.

16:10 Then Asa was wroth with the seer, and put him in a prison house; for he was in a rage with him because of this thing. And Asa oppressed some of the people the same time." (2 Chronicles 16:7-10 KJV)

Many have used (sometimes with tragic consequences) Asa's "sought not to the LORD, but to the physicians" as a reason to not seek the professional help of physicians, but it should be kept in mind that faith was often used in conjunction with the work of physicians (e.g. see Hezekiah's Healing, The Healing Of Naaman, The Healing Of A Soul At The Beautiful Gate, Healing Of The Waters, The Healing Spirit and Prayer and Fasting) and that one of the Gospel writers, Luke, was a physician (see the Fact Finder question below). Even during the 1,000 years after Christ's return (see The Kingdom Of The LORD God), "22:2 In the midst of the street of it, and on either side of the river, was there the tree of life, which bare twelve manner of fruits, and yielded her fruit every month: and the leaves of the tree were for the healing of the nations" (Revelation 22:2 KJV).

So "Asa slept with his fathers, and died in the one and fortieth year of his reign."

"16:11 And, behold, the acts of Asa, first and last, lo, they are written in the book of the kings of Judah and Israel.

16:12 And Asa in the thirty and ninth year of his reign was diseased in his feet, until his disease was exceeding great: yet in his disease he sought not to the LORD, but to the physicians.

16:13 And Asa slept with his fathers, and died in the one and fortieth year of his reign. 16:14 And they buried him in his own sepulchres, which he had made for himself in the city of David, and laid him in the bed which was filled with sweet odours and divers kinds of spices prepared by the apothecaries' art: and they made a very great burning for him." (2 Chronicles 16:11-14 KJV)

Fact Finder: Was Luke a doctor who faithfully looked to the LORD?
See Luke: The World Of The LORD and Acts: Luke's Second Letter To Theophilus


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This Day In History, August 14

405 BC: The Battle of Aegospotami, a naval victory of Sparta over Athens, the final battle of the Peloponnesian War. The Athenian commander, Conon, lost 160 of his 180 ships and the 4,000 of his troops that were captured were all executed (see also A History Of Jerusalem: Greeks, Ptolemies, Seleucids).

Sparta 410: Alaric sacked Rome (see also A History Of Jerusalem: Pompey And The Caesars and The Holy Roman Empire Of The German Nation).

1385: The Battle of Aljubartota. A decisive engagement in which Portuguese forces stopped the Spanish invasion of Portugal led by John I, king of Castile. The victory assured Portugal's independence.

1415: The Battle of Ceuta. Portuguese forces under Henry the Navigator were victorious over the Marinids.

1551: Turkish forces captured Tripoli (for the history of the later Turkish-Ottoman Empire, see A History Of Jerusalem: The British Mandate).

1559: Spanish explorer de Luna enters Pensacola Bay, Florida.

1733: The War of the Polish Succession began.

1784: The first Russian colony in Alaska was founded on Kodiak Island.

1893: France became the first country in the world to require motor vehicle registration.

1900: The Boxer Rebellion in China ended.

1912: U.S. Marines invaded Nicaragua to support the U.S.-installed puppet regime there (communist Russia did the same sort of thing through much of the 20th century e.g. Hungary, Poland, East Germany etc.).

1916: During the First World War (1914-1918), Romania declared war on Austria-Hungary.

1941: The Atlantic Charter, a joint declaration issued during the Second World War by Winston Churchill and Franklin Roosevelt (the U.S. at the time still not in the war) after 5 days of conferences aboard warships in the North Atlantic.

1945: Japan formally surrendered at the end of the Second World War. The war's death toll: 15,000,000 military and 38,000,000 civilian dead.

1947: Pakistan was founded when British rule over the region ended and the Asian subcontinent was partitioned into Islamic Pakistan and predominantly Hindu India. Pakistan comprised two portions, West and East, which later became independent Bangladesh.

1973: The secret U.S. bombing of Cambodia ended, marking the end of 12 years of U.S. involvement in Indochina.

1980: Gdansk, Poland shipyard workers under the leadership of Lech Walesa began strikes against the communist government.

1994: The terrorist Ilich Ramirez Sanchez, known as "Carlos the Jackal," was captured.

2003: A days-long power blackout began in the northeast U.S. and Canada, affecting 45 million people in the U.S. and 10 million in Ontario. It was caused by a malfunction at a power plant in Ohio that caused a cascade of power failures in power stations around the Great Lakes region. It was the second-largest blackout in history, second only to the 1999 blackout in Brazil.


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