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Tuesday, April 28 2015

Proverbs 1: Words To Get Ahead

"The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge: but fools despise wisdom and instruction"

The English-language word "proverb" originated from a compound Latin word, pro, meaning first, or ahead, and verbum, meaning a word. The applied meaning of "proverbs" are words to get ahead. From the Biblical perspective, it means not merely getting ahead of others in worldly competition (that's a dead end as much for the "winners" as the losers), but how to get ahead of the carnal state of mind and live according to the winning way that will arrive at eternal life.

"Proverb" is used to translate the Hebrew word, pronounced maw-shawl, that meant a wise saying - not merely having wisdom, but using it.

Orchard Proverbs are most familiar from the Book of Proverbs, but the same word is used through the Scriptures. An example, as spoken by David to Saul (see Why Didn't David Kill Saul?):

"24:12 The LORD judge between me and thee, and the LORD avenge me of thee: but mine hand shall not be upon thee. 24:13 As saith the proverb of the ancients, Wickedness proceedeth from the wicked: but mine hand shall not be upon thee." (1 Samuel 24:12-13 KJV)

David's son Solomon was wise and intelligent in his youth. He loved science and writing - while never for a moment losing sight of the Creator of all things (see The Christian Universe and What Did Jesus Tell John About Creation?).

"4:30 And Solomon's wisdom excelled the wisdom of all the children of the east country, and all the wisdom of Egypt. 4:31 For he was wiser than all men; than Ethan the Ezrahite, and Heman, and Chalcol, and Darda, the sons of Mahol: and his fame was in all nations round about.

4:32 And he spake three thousand proverbs: and his songs were a thousand and five.

4:33 And he spake of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall: he spake also of beasts, and of fowl, and of creeping things, and of fishes.

4:34 And there came of all people to hear the wisdom of Solomon, from all kings of the earth, which had heard of his wisdom." (1 Kings 4:30-34 KJV)

The Book of Proverbs begins with a statement of the basis of all true wisdom: "To know wisdom and instruction; to perceive the words of understanding ... The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge: but fools despise wisdom and instruction."

"1:1 The proverbs of Solomon the son of David, king of Israel;

1:2 To know wisdom and instruction; to perceive the words of understanding; 1:3 To receive the instruction of wisdom, justice, and judgment, and equity; 1:4 To give subtilty to the simple, to the young man knowledge and discretion. 1:5 A wise man will hear, and will increase learning; and a man of understanding shall attain unto wise counsels: 1:6 To understand a proverb, and the interpretation; the words of the wise, and their dark sayings. 1:7 The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge: but fools despise wisdom and instruction.

1:8 My son, hear the instruction of thy father, and forsake not the law of thy mother: 1:9 For they shall be an ornament of grace unto thy head, and chains about thy neck.

1:10 My son, if sinners entice thee, consent thou not. 1:11 If they say, Come with us, let us lay wait for blood, let us lurk privily for the innocent without cause: 1:12 Let us swallow them up alive as the grave; and whole, as those that go down into the pit: 1:13 We shall find all precious substance, we shall fill our houses with spoil: 1:14 Cast in thy lot among us; let us all have one purse: 1:15 My son, walk not thou in the way with them; refrain thy foot from their path: 1:16 For their feet run to evil, and make haste to shed blood. 1:17 Surely in vain the net is spread in the sight of any bird. 1:18 And they lay wait for their own blood; they lurk privily for their own lives. 1:19 So are the ways of every one that is greedy of gain; which taketh away the life of the owners thereof.

1:20 Wisdom crieth without; she uttereth her voice in the streets: 1:21 She crieth in the chief place of concourse, in the openings of the gates: in the city she uttereth her words, saying, 1:22 How long, ye simple ones, will ye love simplicity? and the scorners delight in their scorning, and fools hate knowledge? 1:23 Turn you at my reproof: behold, I will pour out my spirit unto you, I will make known my words unto you. 1:24 Because I have called, and ye refused; I have stretched out my hand, and no man regarded; 1:25 But ye have set at nought all my counsel, and would none of my reproof: 1:26 I also will laugh at your calamity; I will mock when your fear cometh; 1:27 When your fear cometh as desolation, and your destruction cometh as a whirlwind; when distress and anguish cometh upon you.

1:28 Then shall they call upon me, but I will not answer; they shall seek me early, but they shall not find me: 1:29 For that they hated knowledge, and did not choose the fear of the LORD: 1:30 They would none of my counsel: they despised all my reproof. 1:31 Therefore shall they eat of the fruit of their own way, and be filled with their own devices. 1:32 For the turning away of the simple shall slay them, and the prosperity of fools shall destroy them. 1:33 But whoso hearkeneth unto me shall dwell safely, and shall be quiet from fear of evil." (Proverbs 1:1-33 KJV)

Fact Finder: How and when does true wisdom become nothing more than a narcissistic love of one's self?
See When The Love Of Wisdom Becomes Love Of Self


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This Day In History, April 28

357: Emperor Constantius II entered Rome for the first time after his victory over Magnus Magnentius.

1192: Conrad of Montferrat (Conrad I), "King of Jerusalem," was assassinated in Tyre (see also Constantine's Crusades In History And Prophecy).

1282: The people of Palermo lead a revolt against French rule in Sicily.

1503: The French were defeated by the Spanish under Gonsalvo de Cordoba at the battle of Cerignola near Naples. It is regarded as the first battle in history won by weapons using gunpowder.

Mutiny On The Bounty 1521: In Germany, Protestant reformer Martin Luther wrote in a letter: "The authority of Scripture is greater than the comprehension of the whole of man's reason" (an ironic statement because, despite his "protest" against an immoral pope, Luther, and all of the "protestant" churches to this day maintain nearly all of the Church of Rome's anti-Bible doctrines e.g. Sun Worship).

1686: The first volume of Isaac Newton's Principia Mathamatic was published.

1760: One of the bloodiest battles in Canadian history. In an attempt to recapture Quebec City, Francois de Levis and his French force of 5,000 men attacked the British on the Plains of Abraham in what became known as the Battle of Ste-Foy. The British resorted to Quebec City, which they still held, and Levis was unable to take control of the city before British reinforcements arrived May 10. Levis was forced to retire to Montreal.

1770: Captain James Cook landed at Botany Bay in Australia.

1789: The crew of the Bounty, led by the traitor Fletcher Christian, mutinied against Captain William Bligh, and set the captain and 18 crew members adrift in an open boat. Some of the mutineers settled on Pitcairn Island, east of Tahiti, where their descendants still live.

1792: France invaded the Austrian Netherlands (present-day Belgium), beginning the French Revolutionary War.

1817: Britain and the U.S. signed the Rush-Bagot Treaty, in which they agreed not to have guns or ships of war on the frontier waters of the Great Lakes.

1920: Azerbaijan joined the Soviet Union.

1944: Exercise "Tiger" ended with 750 U.S. soldiers dead in a D-Day rehearsal after their convoy ships were attacked by German torpedo boats off Slapton Sands, on the southwest coast of England.

1945: At the end of the Second World War, Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, 62, and his mistress, Clara Petacci, were captured and shot by Italian partisans while attempting to flee to Switzerland. The next day, their mutilated corpses were hung from lamp posts in Milan for public display.

1947: Thor Heyerdahl and five crew mates set out from Peru on the Kon-Tiki to prove that Peruvian natives could have settled Polynesia.

1969: Charles de Gaulle resigned as president of France.

1974: At the end of the Vietnam War, the last U.S. military and diplomatic (i.e. CIA) personnel were evacuated from Saigon as the city was about to be taken by North Vietnamese forces.

1992: The body of Grand Duke Vladimir Kirillovich Romanov, heir to the vacant Russian throne, was returned to St. Petersburg to be buried in the city of his czar ancestors.



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